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      Thrombin signalling and protease-activated receptors.

      Nature

      metabolism, Thrombin, Signal Transduction, Receptors, Thrombin, Platelet Activation, Humans, Endothelium, Vascular, Endopeptidases, Blood Vessels, Blood Cells, Animals

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          Abstract

          How does the coagulation protease thrombin regulate cellular behaviour? The protease-activated receptors (PARs) provide one answer. In concert with the coagulation cascade, these receptors provide an elegant mechanism linking mechanical information in the form of tissue injury or vascular leakage to cellular responses. Roles for PARs are beginning to emerge in haemostasis and thrombosis, inflammation, and perhaps even blood vessel development.

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          Most cited references 42

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          Molecular cloning of a functional thrombin receptor reveals a novel proteolytic mechanism of receptor activation.

          We isolated a cDNA encoding a functional human thrombin receptor by direct expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes. mRNA encoding this receptor was detected in human platelets and vascular endothelial cells. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a new member of the seven transmembrane domain receptor family with a large amino-terminal extracellular extension containing a remarkable feature. A putative thrombin cleavage site (LDPR/S) resembling the activation cleavage site in the zymogen protein C (LDPR/I) was noted 41 amino acids carboxyl to the receptor's start methionine. A peptide mimicking the new amino terminus created by cleavage at R41 was a potent agonist for both thrombin receptor activation and platelet activation. "Uncleavable" mutant thrombin receptors failed to respond to thrombin but were responsive to the new amino-terminal peptide. These data reveal a novel signaling mechanism in which thrombin cleaves its receptor's amino-terminal extension to create a new receptor amino terminus that functions as a tethered ligand and activates the receptor.
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            CD40 ligand on activated platelets triggers an inflammatory reaction of endothelial cells.

            CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154), a transmembrane protein structurally related to the cytokine TNF-alpha, was originally identified on stimulated CD4+ T cells, and later on stimulated mast cells and basophils. Interaction of CD40L on T cells with CD40 on B cells is of paramount importance for the development and function of the humoral immune system. CD40 is not only constitutively present on B cells, but it is also found on monocytes, macrophages and endothelial cells, suggesting that CD40L has a broader function in vivo. We now report that platelets express CD40L within seconds of activation in vitro and in the process of thrombus formation in vivo. Like TNF-alpha and interleukin-1, CD40L on platelets induces endothelial cells to secrete chemokines and to express adhesion molecules, thereby generating signals for the recruitment and extravasation of leukocytes at the site of injury. Our results indicate that platelets are not only involved in haemostasis but that they also directly initiate an inflammatory response of the vessel wall.
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              EGF receptor transactivation by G-protein-coupled receptors requires metalloproteinase cleavage of proHB-EGF.

               N Prenzel,  E B Zwick,  H Daub (2015)
              Cross-communication between different signalling systems allows the integration of the great diversity of stimuli that a cell receives under varying physiological situations. The transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent signalling pathways upon stimulation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are critical for the mitogenic activity of ligands such as lysophosphatidic acid, endothelin, thrombin, bombesin and carbachol, provides evidence for such an interconnected communication network. Here we show that EGFR transactivation upon GPCR stimulation involves proHB-EGF and a metalloproteinase activity that is rapidly induced upon GPCR-ligand interaction. We show that inhibition of proHB-EGF processing blocks GPCR-induced EGFR transactivation and downstream signals. The pathophysiological significance of this mechanism is demonstrated by inhibition of constitutive EGFR activity upon treatment of PC3 prostate carcinoma cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat. Together, our results establish a new mechanistic concept for cross-communication among different signalling systems.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1038/35025229
                11001069

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