Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Short QT Syndrome: A Predictable Story

      a , * , b , c

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 15

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Sudden death associated with short-QT syndrome linked to mutations in HERG.

          Sudden cardiac death takes the lives of more than 300 000 Americans annually. Malignant ventricular arrhythmias occurring in individuals with structurally normal hearts account for a subgroup of these sudden deaths. The present study describes the genetic basis for a new clinical entity characterized by sudden death and short-QT intervals in the ECG. Three families with hereditary short-QT syndrome and a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death were studied. In 2 of them, we identified 2 different missense mutations resulting in the same amino acid change (N588K) in the S5-P loop region of the cardiac IKr channel HERG (KCNH2). The mutations dramatically increase IKr, leading to heterogeneous abbreviation of action potential duration and refractoriness, and reduce the affinity of the channels to IKr blockers. We demonstrate a novel genetic and biophysical mechanism responsible for sudden death in infants, children, and young adults caused by mutations in KCNH2. The occurrence of sudden cardiac death in the first 12 months of life in 2 patients suggests the possibility of a link between KCNH2 gain of function mutations and sudden infant death syndrome. KCNH2 is the binding target for a wide spectrum of cardiac and noncardiac pharmacological compounds. Our findings may provide better understanding of drug interaction with KCNH2 and have implications for diagnosis and therapy of this and other arrhythmogenic diseases.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A novel form of short QT syndrome (SQT3) is caused by a mutation in the KCNJ2 gene.

            Short QT syndrome (SQTS) leads to an abbreviated QTc interval and predisposes patients to life-threatening arrhythmias. To date, two forms of the disease have been identified: SQT1, caused by a gain of function substitution in the HERG (I(Kr)) channel, and SQT2, caused by a gain of function substitution in the KvLQT1 (I(Ks)) channel. Here we identify a new variant, "SQT3", which has a unique ECG phenotype characterized by asymmetrical T waves, and a defect in the gene coding for the inwardly rectifying Kir2.1 (I(K1)) channel. The affected members of a single family had a G514A substitution in the KCNJ2 gene that resulted in a change from aspartic acid to asparagine at position 172 (D172N). Whole-cell patch-clamp studies of the heterologously expressed human D172N channel demonstrated a larger outward I(K1) than the wild-type (P<0.05) at potentials between -75 mV and -45 mV, with the peak current being shifted in the former with respect to the latter (WT, -75 mV; D172N, -65 mV). Coexpression of WT and mutant channels to mimic the heterozygous condition of the proband yielded an outward current that was intermediate between WT and D172N. In computer simulations using a human ventricular myocyte model the increased outward I(K1) greatly accelerated the final phase of repolarization, and shortened the action potential duration. Hence, unlike the known mutations in the two other SQTS forms (N588K in HERG and V307L in KvLQT1), simulations using the D172N and WT/D172N mutations fully accounted for the ECG phenotype of tall and asymmetrically shaped T waves. Although we were unable to test for inducibility of arrhythmia susceptibility due to lack of patients' consent, our computer simulations predict a steeper steady-state restitution curve for the D172N and WT/D172N mutation, compared with WT or to HERG or KvLQT1 mutations, which may predispose SQT3 patients to a greater risk of reentrant arrhythmias.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Mutation in the KCNQ1 gene leading to the short QT-interval syndrome.

              The electrocardiographic short QT-interval syndrome forms a distinct clinical entity presenting with a high rate of sudden death and exceptionally short QT intervals. The disorder has recently been linked to gain-of-function mutation in KCNH2. The present study demonstrates that this disorder is genetically heterogeneous and can also be caused by mutation in the KCNQ1 gene. A 70-year man presented with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Both immediately after the episode and much later, his QT interval was abnormally short without any other physical or electrophysiological anomalies. Analysis of candidate genes identified a g919c substitution in KCNQ1 encoding the K+ channel KvLQT1. Functional studies of the KvLQT1 V307L mutant (alone or coexpressed with the wild-type channel, in the presence of IsK) revealed a pronounced shift of the half-activation potential and an acceleration of the activation kinetics leading to a gain of function in I(Ks). When introduced in a human action potential computer model, the modified biophysical parameters predicted repolarization shortening. We present an alternative molecular mechanism for the short QT-interval syndrome. Functional and computational studies of the KCNQ1 V307L mutation identified in a patient with this disorder favor the association of short QT with mutation in KCNQ1.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2014
                June 2014
                06 May 2014
                : 128
                : 3
                : 231-233
                Affiliations
                aHospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; bRutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, N.J., USA; cCardiovascular Division, UZ Brussel and VUB, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
                Author notes
                *Josep Brugada, Medical Director and Professor of Medicine, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, ES-08036 Barcelona (Spain), E-Mail jbrugada@clinic.ub.es
                Article
                359995 Cardiology 2014;128:231-233
                10.1159/000359995
                24818800
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Pages: 3
                Categories
                Citation Classics

                General medicine, Neurology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal medicine, Nephrology

                Comments

                Comment on this article