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      Adults’ food skills and use of gardens are not associated with household food insecurity in Canada

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          Abstract

          OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which Canadian adults’ food preparation and cooking skills and use of home or community gardens relate to their household food insecurity status; and to compare the food shopping and cooking behaviours of adults in food-secure and food-insecure households. METHODS: Data were drawn from two Rapid Response Modules appended to the Canadian Community Health Survey in 2012 and 201 3. The analytic sample comprised 16,496 respondents 18 years and older. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the association between food insecurity and adults’ self-rated cooking abilities, food preparation skills score, use of gardens, food shopping behaviours, and cooking behaviours, while adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Adults in food-insecure households did not differ significantly from others with respect to their food preparation skills or cooking ability, and neither variable predicted the odds of household food insecurity when socio-demographic characteristics were taken into account. Adults in food-insecure households were less likely to use a garden for food, but gardening was unrelated to the odds of food insecurity. Shopping with a budget was more common among adults in food-insecure households, but no other differences in food shopping behaviours were observed after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics. Adults in food-insecure households were as likely as others to adjust recipes to make them healthier, but they had higher odds of adjusting recipes to reduce their fat content. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that household food insecurity in Canada is not a problem of insufficient food skills.

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          Most cited references12

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          Association between household food insecurity and annual health care costs.

          Household food insecurity, a measure of income-related problems of food access, is growing in Canada and is tightly linked to poorer health status. We examined the association between household food insecurity status and annual health care costs.
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            How does your garden grow? An empirical evaluation of the costs and potential of urban gardening

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              A difference-in-differences approach to estimate the effect of income-supplementation on food insecurity.

              The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is a 2006 Canadian federal policy of income supplementation that provides parents with $100 monthly in Canadian dollars for each child aged <6years. The study main objective was to estimate the causal effect of UCCB on self-reported food insecurity overall and in vulnerable subgroups.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of Public Health
                Can J Public Health
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0008-4263
                1920-7476
                November 2016
                November 1 2016
                November 2016
                : 107
                : 6
                : e526-e532
                Article
                10.17269/CJPH.107.5692
                6972328
                28252370
                c9cdac2f-985d-4482-bf1f-8d20dc7c17b1
                © 2016

                http://www.springer.com/tdm


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