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      Impact of social support and self-efficacy on functioning in depressed older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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          Abstract

          Objective

          The objective of this study was to examine the association between social support, self-efficacy, and functioning among a sample of depressed older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

          Methods

          Participants were recruited immediately following admission to an acute pulmonary rehabilitation unit of a rehabilitation hospital. One hundred and fifty-six subjects completed assessments of depression, functioning, social support, and self-efficacy at admission to the rehabilitation unit. Regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the impact of different aspects of social support and self-efficacy on overall functioning at admission.

          Results

          Controlling for depression, COPD severity, and age, subjective social support (p = 0.05) and self-efficacy (p < 0.01) were associated with overall functioning.

          Conclusion

          The perception of social support as well as self-efficacy are important constructs related to overall functioning among depressed older adults with COPD. Attention to these psychosocial variables in health management interventions may help maintain or improve the overall functioning of depressed COPD patients.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
          International Journal of COPD
          International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
          Dove Medical Press
          1176-9106
          1178-2005
          December 2008
          December 2008
          : 3
          : 4
          : 713-718
          Affiliations
          Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, White Plains, NY, USA
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Patricia Marino, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 21 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY, 10605, USA, Tel +1 914 997 8691, Email pam2029@ 123456med.cornell.edu
          Article
          copd-3-713
          2650598
          19281085
          © 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved
          Categories
          Original Research

          Respiratory medicine

          self-efficacy, functioning, depression, copd, social support

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