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      Remote monitoring of pain and symptoms using wireless technology in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

      Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners

      Anemia, Sickle Cell, complications, physiopathology, Cell Phones, Child, Data Collection, Female, Humans, Internet, Intervention Studies, Male, Pain, drug therapy, etiology, Pain Measurement, methods, Prospective Studies, Wireless Technology

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          Abstract

          The purpose of this study was to examine (a) symptoms, (b) pain characteristics (intensity, location, quality), (c) pain medications and nonpharmacological strategies used for pain, (d) thoughts and feelings, and (e) healthcare visits. We also examined the relationship between pain and sleep. Pain and symptoms were entered on an electronic e-Diary using a smartphone and were remotely monitored by an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). Sixty-seven children and adolescents (10-17 years) reported mild to severe pain at home that did not require healthcare visits. Symptoms reported were (a) general symptoms such as tiredness/fatigue (34.7%), headache (20.8%), yellowing of the eyes (28.4%); (b) respiratory symptoms such as sniffling (32.9%), coughing (19.1%), changes in breathing (10.0%); and (c) musculoskeletal symptoms such as stiffness in joints (15.8%). A significant negative correlation was found between pain and sleep (r = -.387, p = .024). Factors that predict pain included previous history of sickle cell disease (SCD) related events, symptoms, and negative thoughts. Pain and multiple symptoms entered on a web-based e-Diary were remotely monitored by an APRN and prompted communications, further evaluation, and recommendations. Remote monitoring using wireless technology may facilitate timely management of pain and symptoms and minimize negative consequences in SCD. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          10.1111/j.1745-7599.2012.00754.x
          3539233
          23279278

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