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      Evolution of a clade of Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 1, lineage 1 via acquisition of carbapenem- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes and dispersion of ISAba1

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          Abstract

          Resistance to carbapenem and aminoglycoside antibiotics is a critical problem in Acinetobacter baumannii , particularly when genes conferring resistance are acquired by multiply or extensively resistant members of successful globally distributed clonal complexes, such as global clone 1 (GC1) . Here, we investigate the evolution of an expanding clade of lineage 1 of the GC1 complex via repeated acquisition of carbapenem- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes. Lineage 1 arose in the late 1970s and the Tn 6168/OCL3 clade arose in the late 1990s from an ancestor that had already acquired resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. Between 2000 and 2002, two distinct subclades have emerged, and they are distinguishable via the presence of an integrated phage genome in subclade 1 and AbaR4 (carrying the oxa23 carbapenem-resistance gene in Tn 2006) at a specific chromosomal location in subclade 2. Part or all of the original resistance gene cluster in the chromosomally located AbaR3 has been lost from some isolates, but plasmids carrying alternate resistance genes have been gained. In one group in subclade 2, the chromosomally located AbGRI3, carrying the armA aminoglycoside-resistance gene, has been acquired from a GC2 isolate and incorporated via homologous recombination. ISAba1 entered the common ancestor of this clade as part of the cephalosporin-resistance transposon Tn 6168 and has dispersed differently in each subclade. Members of subclade 1 share an ISAba1 in one specific position in the chromosome and in subclade 2 two different ISAba1 locations are shared. Further shared ISAba1 locations distinguish further divisions, potentially providing simple markers for epidemiological studies.

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          Most cited references 28

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          OXA β-lactamases.

          The OXA β-lactamases were among the earliest β-lactamases detected; however, these molecular class D β-lactamases were originally relatively rare and always plasmid mediated. They had a substrate profile limited to the penicillins, but some became able to confer resistance to cephalosporins. From the 1980s onwards, isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii that were resistant to the carbapenems emerged, manifested by plasmid-encoded β-lactamases (OXA-23, OXA-40, and OXA-58) categorized as OXA enzymes because of their sequence similarity to earlier OXA β-lactamases. It was soon found that every A. baumannii strain possessed a chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamase (OXA-51-like), some of which could confer resistance to carbapenems when the genetic environment around the gene promoted its expression. Similarly, Acinetobacter species closely related to A. baumannii also possessed their own chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamases; some could be transferred to A. baumannii, and they formed the basis of transferable carbapenem resistance in this species. In some cases, the carbapenem-resistant OXA β-lactamases (OXA-48) have migrated into the Enterobacteriaceae and are becoming a significant cause of carbapenem resistance. The emergence of OXA enzymes that can confer resistance to carbapenems, particularly in A. baumannii, has transformed these β-lactamases from a minor hindrance into a major problem set to demote the clinical efficacy of the carbapenems.
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            Genome-scale rates of evolutionary change in bacteria

            Estimating the rates at which bacterial genomes evolve is critical to understanding major evolutionary and ecological processes such as disease emergence, long-term host–pathogen associations and short-term transmission patterns. The surge in bacterial genomic data sets provides a new opportunity to estimate these rates and reveal the factors that shape bacterial evolutionary dynamics. For many organisms estimates of evolutionary rate display an inverse association with the time-scale over which the data are sampled. However, this relationship remains unexplored in bacteria due to the difficulty in estimating genome-wide evolutionary rates, which are impacted by the extent of temporal structure in the data and the prevalence of recombination. We collected 36 whole genome sequence data sets from 16 species of bacterial pathogens to systematically estimate and compare their evolutionary rates and assess the extent of temporal structure in the absence of recombination. The majority (28/36) of data sets possessed sufficient clock-like structure to robustly estimate evolutionary rates. However, in some species reliable estimates were not possible even with ‘ancient DNA’ data sampled over many centuries, suggesting that they evolve very slowly or that they display extensive rate variation among lineages. The robustly estimated evolutionary rates spanned several orders of magnitude, from approximately 10−5 to 10−8 nucleotide substitutions per site year−1. This variation was negatively associated with sampling time, with this relationship best described by an exponential decay curve. To avoid potential estimation biases, such time-dependency should be considered when inferring evolutionary time-scales in bacteria.
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              Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterobacteriaceae due to 16S rRNA methylation.

              A self-transferable plasmid of ca. 80 kb, pIP1204, conferred multiple-antibiotic resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae BM4536, which was isolated from a urinary tract infection. Resistance to beta-lactams was due to the bla(TEM1) and bla(CTX-M) genes, resistance to trimethroprim was due to the dhfrXII gene, resistance to sulfonamides was due to the sul1 gene, resistance to streptomycin-spectinomycin was due to the ant3"9 gene, and resistance to nearly all remaining aminoglycosides was due to the aac3-II gene and a new gene designated armA (aminoglycoside resistance methylase). The cloning of armA into a plasmid in Escherichia coli conferred to the new host high-level resistance to 4,6-disubstituted deoxystreptamines and fortimicin. The deduced sequence of ArmA displayed from 37 to 47% similarity to those of 16S rRNA m(7)G methyltransferases from various actinomycetes, which confer resistance to aminoglycoside-producing strains. However, the low guanine-plus-cytosine content of armA (30%) does not favor an actinomycete origin for the gene. It therefore appears that posttranscriptional modification of 16S rRNA can confer high-level broad-range resistance to aminoglycosides in gram-negative human pathogens.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Microb Genom
                Microb Genom
                mgen
                mgen
                Microbial Genomics
                Microbiology Society
                2057-5858
                January 2019
                16 January 2019
                16 January 2019
                : 5
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [ 1]School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney , Sydney, Australia
                [ 2]The ithree Institute, University of Technology Sydney , Ultimo, NSW, Australia
                [ 3]Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne , Melbourne, Australia
                [ 4]London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine , London, UK
                Author notes
                *Correspondence: Ruth M. Hall, ruth.hall@ 123456sydney.edu.au
                Article
                mgen000242
                10.1099/mgen.0.000242
                6412058
                30648939
                © 2019 The Authors

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: National Health and Medical Research Council
                Award ID: GNT1079616
                Funded by: Sylvia and Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation
                Award ID: none
                Funded by: University of Technology Sydney
                Award ID: CPDRF PRO17-4005
                Categories
                Research Article
                Microbial Evolution and Epidemiology: Mechanisms of Evolution
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