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      Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells.

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      Nature

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          Abstract

          Endothelial cells that line capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establishes specialized vascular niches that deploy sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors. These cues participate actively in the induction, specification, patterning and guidance of organ regeneration, as well as in the maintainance of homeostasis and metabolism. When upregulated following injury, they orchestrate self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the mechanisms by which organotypic endothelium distributes physiological levels of angiocrine factors both spatially and temporally will lay the foundation for clinical trials that promote organ repair without scarring.

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          Most cited references 119

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          Molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of angiogenesis.

          Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to every part of the body, but also nourish diseases such as cancer. Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis (blood vessel growth) has increased at an explosive rate and has led to the approval of anti-angiogenic drugs for cancer and eye diseases. So far, hundreds of thousands of patients have benefited from blockers of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor, but limited efficacy and resistance remain outstanding problems. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown new molecular targets and principles, which may provide avenues for improving the therapeutic benefit from anti-angiogenic strategies.
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            SLAM family receptors distinguish hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and reveal endothelial niches for stem cells.

            To improve our ability to identify hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their localization in vivo, we compared the gene expression profiles of highly purified HSCs and non-self-renewing multipotent hematopoietic progenitors (MPPs). Cell surface receptors of the SLAM family, including CD150, CD244, and CD48, were differentially expressed among functionally distinct progenitors. HSCs were highly purified as CD150(+)CD244(-)CD48(-) cells while MPPs were CD244(+)CD150(-)CD48(-) and most restricted progenitors were CD48(+)CD244(+)CD150(-). The primitiveness of hematopoietic progenitors could thus be predicted based on the combination of SLAM family members they expressed. This is the first family of receptors whose combinatorial expression precisely distinguishes stem and progenitor cells. The ability to purify HSCs based on a simple combination of SLAM receptors allowed us to identify HSCs in tissue sections. Many HSCs were associated with sinusoidal endothelium in spleen and bone marrow, though some HSCs were associated with endosteum. HSCs thus occupy multiple niches, including sinusoidal endothelium in diverse tissues.
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              The bone marrow niche for haematopoietic stem cells.

              Niches are local tissue microenvironments that maintain and regulate stem cells. Haematopoiesis provides a model for understanding mammalian stem cells and their niches, but the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche remains incompletely defined and beset by competing models. Recent progress has been made in elucidating the location and cellular components of the HSC niche in the bone marrow. The niche is perivascular, created partly by mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells and often, but not always, located near trabecular bone. Outstanding questions concern the cellular complexity of the niche, the role of the endosteum and functional heterogeneity among perivascular microenvironments.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ] Ansary Stem Cell Institute, Department of Medicine, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA.
                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Nature
                1476-4687
                0028-0836
                Jan 21 2016
                : 529
                : 7586
                nature17040 NIHMS783852
                10.1038/nature17040
                4878406
                26791722

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