1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Hemodialysis-induced Cardiovascular Disease

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      Seminars in dialysis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          More than half of all deaths among ESRD patients are due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cardiovascular changes secondary to renal dysfunction, including fluid overload, uremic cardiomyopathy, secondary hyperparathyroidism, anemia, altered lipid metabolism, and accumulation of gut microbiota-derived uremic toxins like trimethylamine N-oxidase (TMAO), contribute to the high risk for CVD in the ESRD population. In addition, conventional hemodialysis (HD) itself poses myocardial stress and injury on the already compromised cardiovascular system in uremic patients. This review will provide an overview of cardiovascular changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD, a description of reported mechanisms for HD-induced myocardial injury, comparison of HD with other treatment modalities in the context of CVD, and possible management strategies.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          8911629
          21681
          Semin Dial
          Semin Dial
          Seminars in dialysis
          0894-0959
          1525-139X
          22 March 2018
          06 April 2018
          May 2018
          01 May 2019
          : 31
          : 3
          : 258-267
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
          [2 ]Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland OH
          [3 ]Center for Clinical Genomics, Cleveland Clinic, OH
          [4 ]Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
          Author notes
          Address for Correspondence: W. H. Wilson Tang, MD, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Desk J3-4, Cleveland, OH 44195. Phone: (216) 444-2121, Fax: (216) 445-6165, tangw@ 123456ccf.org
          Article
          PMC6023623 PMC6023623 6023623 nihpa951049
          10.1111/sdi.12694
          6023623
          29624739
          Categories
          Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article