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      Bacterial colonization reprograms the neonatal gut metabolome

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          Metabolomic analysis via reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography coupled to a stand alone orbitrap mass spectrometer.

          We present a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method that capitalizes on the mass-resolving power of the orbitrap to enable sensitive and specific measurement of known and unanticipated metabolites in parallel, with a focus on water-soluble species involved in core metabolism. The reversed phase LC method, with a cycle time 25 min, involves a water-methanol gradient on a C18 column with tributylamine as the ion pairing agent. The MS portion involves full scans from 85 to 1000 m/z at 1 Hz and 100,000 resolution in negative ion mode on a stand alone orbitrap ("Exactive"). The median limit of detection, across 80 metabolite standards, was 5 ng/mL with the linear range typically >or=100-fold. For both standards and a cellular extract from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast), the median inter-run relative standard deviation in peak intensity was 8%. In yeast exact, we detected 137 known compounds, whose (13)C-labeling patterns could also be tracked to probe metabolic flux. In yeast engineered to lack a gene of unknown function (YKL215C), we observed accumulation of an ion of m/z 128.0351, which we subsequently confirmed to be oxoproline, resulting in annotation of YKL215C as an oxoprolinase. These examples demonstrate the suitability of the present method for quantitative metabolomics, fluxomics, and discovery metabolite profiling.
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            Development of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and insights from high-throughput sequencing.

            Little was known about the development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota, until recently, because of difficulties in obtaining sufficient sequence information from enough people or time points. Now, with decreased costs of DNA sequencing and improved bioinformatic tools, we can compare GI tract bacterial communities among individuals, of all ages from infancy to adulthood. Some key recent findings are that the initial bacterial community, even in the GI tract, depends strongly on delivery mode; that the process of early development of the microbiota is highly unstable and idiosyncratic; that the microbiota differs considerably among children from different countries; and that older adults have substantially different GI tract communities than younger adults, indicating that the GI tract microbiota can change throughout life. We relate these observations to different models of evolution including the evolution of senescence and suggest that probiotics be selected based on patient age. Studies of the microbiota in older people might tell us which probiotics could increase longevity. Drug metabolism varies among individuals with different microbial communities, so age- and region-specific clinical trials are required to ensure safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Is Open Access

              The early infant gut microbiome varies in association with a maternal high-fat diet

              Background Emerging evidence suggests that the in utero environment is not sterile as once presumed. Work in the mouse demonstrated transmission of commensal bacteria from mother to fetus during gestation, though it is unclear what modulates this process. We have previously shown in the nonhuman primate that, independent of obesity, a maternal high-fat diet during gestation and lactation persistently shapes the juvenile gut microbiome. We therefore sought to interrogate in a population-based human longitudinal cohort whether a maternal high-fat diet similarly alters the neonatal and infant gut microbiome in early life. Methods A representative cohort was prospectively enrolled either in the early third trimester or intrapartum (n = 163), with a subset consented to longitudinal sampling through the postpartum interval (n = 81). Multiple body site samples, including stool and meconium, were collected from neonates at delivery and by 6 weeks of age. A rapid dietary questionnaire was administered to estimate intake of fat, added sugars, and fiber over the past month (National Health and Examination Survey). DNA was extracted from each infant meconium/stool sample (MoBio) and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analysis. Results On average, the maternal dietary intake of fat ranged from 14.0 to 55.2 %, with an average intake of 33.1 % (σ = 6.1 %). Mothers whose diets significantly differed from the mean (±1 standard deviation) were separated into two distinct groups, a control group (n = 13, μ = 24.4 %) and a high-fat group (n = 13, μ = 43.1 %). Principal coordinate analysis revealed that the microbiome of the neonatal stool at birth (meconium) clustered differently by virtue of maternal gestational diet (PERMANOVA p = 0.001). LEfSe feature selection identified several taxa that discriminated the groups, with a notable relative depletion of Bacteroides in the neonates exposed to a maternal high-fat gestational diet (Student’s t-test, p < 0.05) that persisted to 6 weeks of age. Conclusions Similar to the primate, independent of maternal body mass index, a maternal high-fat diet is associated with distinct changes in the neonatal gut microbiome at birth which persist through 4–6 weeks of age. Our findings underscore the importance of counseling pregnant mothers on macronutrient consumption during pregnancy and lactation. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13073-016-0330-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Microbiology
                Nat Microbiol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                2058-5276
                April 13 2020
                Article
                10.1038/s41564-020-0694-0
                © 2020

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