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      Multi-isotope signatures (Cu, Zn, Pb) of different particle sizes in road-deposited sediments: a case study from industrial area

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      Journal of Analytical Science and Technology
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          Road-deposited sediments (RDS) are major sources of heavy metal contamination in urban areas and adversely affect surrounding environments and human health. Multi-isotope combinations (Cu, Zn, and Pb), which serve as environmental tracers, enable the identification and management of metal contaminants in RDS. Here, we present Cu, Zn, and Pb isotopic data for the first time in size-fractionated RDS samples collected from industrial areas to describe the relationship between the RDS and total suspended solids (TSS) in runoff, and to explore the feasibility of using multi-isotopes to identify sources of metal contamination. RDS in the industrial study areas had high concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Pb, and their δ 65Cu AE647, δ 66Zn IRMM3702, and 206Pb/ 207Pb values ranged from − 0.33 to + 0.73‰, − 0.36 to + 0.01‰, and 1.1418 to 1.1616, respectively. The variation in δ 65Cu AE64765Cu max-min) was larger than that of δ 66Zn IRMM3702 (i.e., δ 66Zn max-min), and the isotope values of Zn and Pb ( 206Pb/ 207Pb) tended to increase with the concentrations of these elements. Meanwhile, the fine RDS particles (< 63 µm) had similar Cu, Zn, and Pb isotopic compositions to those of TSS. Hierarchical cluster analyses revealed that the < 63 µm RDS fractions were associated with the TSS. Our results also showed that a combination of Pb and either Cu or Zn could be used to distinguish between RDS and non-exhaust emissions (e.g., brake pads, tires, etc.). Multi-isotope approaches utilizing Cu, Zn, and Pb and more robust isotopic data on individual sources of metal contamination could be useful for identifying pollution sources and understanding their environmental impacts.

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          A Scale of Grade and Class Terms for Clastic Sediments

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            Tyre and road wear particles (TRWP) - A review of generation, properties, emissions, human health risk, ecotoxicity, and fate in the environment

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              Heavy metals from non-exhaust vehicle emissions in urban and motorway road dusts

              The main sources of non-exhaust vehicular emissions that contribute to road dust are tire, brake and clutch wear, road surface wear, and other vehicle and road component degradation. This study is an attempt to identify and investigate heavy metals in urban and motorway road dusts as well as in dust from brake linings and tires. Road dust was collected from sections of the A-4 motorway in Poland, which is part of European route E40, and from urban roads in Katowice, Poland. Dust from a relatively unpolluted mountain road was collected and examined as a control sample. Selected metals Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Se, Sr, Ba, Ti, and Pd were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-optical emission spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy on a range of size-fractionated road dust and brake lining dust ( 250 μm). The compositions of brake lining and tire dust were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy. To estimate the degree of potential environmental risk of non-exhaust emissions, comparison with the geochemical background and the calculations of geo-accumulation indices were performed. The finest fractions of urban and motorway dusts were significantly contaminated with all of the investigated metals, especially with Ti, Cu, and Cr, which are well-recognized key tracers of non-exhaust brake wear. Urban dust was, however, more contaminated than motorway dust. It was therefore concluded that brake lining and tire wear strongly contributed to the contamination of road dust.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Journal of Analytical Science and Technology
                J Anal Sci Technol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                2093-3371
                December 2021
                August 20 2021
                December 2021
                : 12
                : 1
                Article
                10.1186/s40543-021-00292-4
                caac5d22-4c8b-47ce-85b8-2788ba4f9990
                © 2021

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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