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      Envisioning and shaping translation of knowledge into action: A comparative case-study of stakeholder engagement in the development of a European tobacco control tool

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          Abstract

          Stakeholder engagement in health policy research is often said to increase ‘research impact’, but the active role of stakeholders in creating impact remains underexplored. We explored how stakeholders shaped the translation of health policy research into action. Our comparative case-study tracked a European research project that aimed to transfer an existing tobacco control return on investment tool. That project also aimed to increase its impact by engaging with stakeholders in further developing the tool. We conducted semi-structured interviews, using an actor-scenario mapping approach. Actor-scenarios can be seen as relational descriptions of a future world. We mapped the scenarios by asking stakeholders to describe who and what would play a role in the tool’s utilisation. Our results show that stakeholders envisioned disparate futures for the tool. Some scenarios were specific, whereas most were generic projections of abstract potential users and responsibilities. We show how stakeholders mobilised elements of context, such as legislative support and agricultural practice, that would affect the tool’s use. We conclude that stakeholders shape knowledge translation processes by continuously putting forth explicit or implicit scenarios about the future. Mapping actor-scenarios may help in aligning knowledge production with utilisation. Insights into potential roles and responsibilities could be fed back in research projects with the aim of increasing the likelihood that the study results may be used.

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          Most cited references 28

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          The Many Meanings of Research Utilization

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            Sociomaterial Practices: Exploring Technology at Work

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              A critical second look at integrated knowledge translation.

              Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) requires active collaboration between researchers and the ultimate users of knowledge throughout a research process, and is being aggressively positioned as an essential strategy to address the problem of underutilization of research-derived knowledge. The purpose of this commentary is to assist potential "knowledge users", particularly those working in policy or service settings, by highlighting some of the more nuanced benefits of the IKT model, as well as some of its potential costs. Actionable outcomes may not be immediately (or ever) forthcoming, but the process of collaboration can result in group-level identity transformation that permits access to different professional perspectives as well as, we suggest, added organizational and social value. As well, the IKT approach provides space for the re-balancing of what is considered "expertise". We offer this paper to help practitioners, administrators and policymakers more realistically assess the potential benefits and costs of engaging in IKT-oriented research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Health Policy
                Health Policy
                Health Policy (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
                Elsevier Scientific Publishers
                0168-8510
                1872-6054
                1 October 2019
                October 2019
                : 123
                : 10
                : 917-923
                Affiliations
                [a ]Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
                [b ]Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
                [c ]Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, A partnership between Kingston, University London and St George’s University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, SW17 0RE, United Kingdom
                [d ]Health Economics Research Group, Institute of Environment, Health and Societies, Brunel University London, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH, United Kingdom
                Author notes
                Article
                S0168-8510(19)30181-2
                10.1016/j.healthpol.2019.07.012
                6876657
                31383372
                © 2019 The Author(s)

                This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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