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      Breathing-controlled electrical stimulation could modify the affective component of neuropathic pain after amputation: a case report

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          Abstract

          In this case, a 31-year-old male suffered phantom neuropathic pain for more than 3 years after an above-the-knee amputation. His shooting phantom pain disappeared after the first session of breathing-controlled electrical stimulation, and reappeared or was triggered 28 days after an experimental error during which he received sustained electrical stimulation. In other words, painful shooting stimuli may not have been “cured” but forgotten and retriggered by a fearful event due to the experimental error. Therefore, this accidental finding provides a unique opportunity to understand sensory and affective components of neuropathic pain, and a novel intervention could modify the affective component of it.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Pain Res
          J Pain Res
          Journal of Pain Research
          Dove Medical Press
          1178-7090
          2012
          12 April 2012
          : 5
          : 71-75
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Medical School – Houston, Houston, TX
          [2 ]UTHealth Motor Recovery Laboratory, Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, USA
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Sheng Li, Research Assistant Professor, 1333 Moursund, Suite B-107, UThealth Motor Recovery Lab at the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, Houston, TX 77030, USA, Tel +1 713 797 7561, Fax +1 713 799 6997, Email sheng.li@ 123456uth.tmc.edu
          Article
          jpr-5-071
          10.2147/JPR.S31036
          3333797
          22536094
          © 2012 Li et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Categories
          Case Report

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