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      Molecular Characterization of Diarrheagenic Escherichia Coli in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age with Diarrhea in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

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          Abstract

          Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) is important bacteria of children’s endemic and epidemic diarrhea worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of DEC isolated from stool samples collected from children with acute diarrhea living in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. From August 2013 to October 2015, stool samples were collected from 315 children under 5 years of age suffering from diarrhea in the “Centre Médical avec Antenne Chirurgicale (CMA)” Paul VI and the CMA of Schiphra. E. coli were isolated and identified by standard microbiological methods, and the 16-plex PCR method was used to further characterize them. Four hundred and nineteen (419) E. coli strains were characterized, of which 31 (7.4%) DEC pathotypes were identified and classified in five E. coli pathotypes: 15 enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) (48.4%), 8 enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (25.8%) with 4 typical EPEC and 4 atypical EPEC, 4 enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) (12.9%), 3 enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) 9.67%, and 1 enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) 3.2%. The use of multiplex PCR as a routine in clinical laboratory for the detection of DEC would be a useful mean for a rapid management of an acute diarrhea in children.

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          Most cited references 62

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          10.321/eid0805.Typical and Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

          Typical and atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains differ in several characteristics. Typical EPEC, a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, is rare in industrialized countries, where atypical EPEC seems to be a more important cause of diarrhea. For typical EPEC, the only reservoir is humans; for atypical EPEC, both animals and humans can be reservoirs. Typical and atypical EPEC also differ in genetic characteristics, serotypes, and virulence properties. Atypical EPEC is more closely related to Shiga toxin–producing E. coli (STEC), and like STEC these strains appear to be emerging pathogens.
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            Detection and characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from young children in Hanoi, Vietnam.

            Diarrhea continues to be one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among infants and children in developing countries. Escherichia coli is an emerging agent among pathogens that cause diarrhea. The development of a highly applicable technique for the detection of different categories of diarrheagenic E. coli is important. We have used multiplex PCR by combining eight primer pairs specific for enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). This facilitates the identification of five different categories of diarrheagenic E. coli from stool samples in a single reaction simultaneously. The prevalences of diarrheagenic E. coli were 22.5 and 12% in the diarrhea group and the control group, respectively. Among 587 fecal samples from Vietnamese children under 5 years of age with diarrhea, this technique identified 132 diarrheagenic E. coli strains. This included 68 samples (11.6%) with EAEC, 12 samples (2.0%) with EIEC, 39 samples (6.6%) with EPEC, and 13 samples (2.2%) with ETEC. Among the 249 age-matched controls, 30 samples were positive for diarrheagenic E. coli. The distribution was 18 samples (7.2%) with EAEC, 11 samples (4.4%) with EPEC, and 1 sample (0.4%) with ETEC.
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              Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli infection in Baltimore, Maryland, and New Haven, Connecticut.

              Diarrhea remains a common complaint among US patients who seek medical attention. We performed a prospective study to determine the etiology of diarrheal illness among patients and control subjects of all ages presenting to the emergency departments and outpatient clinics of 2 large academic hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland, and New Haven, Connecticut. We used molecular methods to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes, including enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), as well as Shiga toxin-producing, cytodetaching, enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic E. coli. Of the pathotypes sought, only EAEC was found in an appreciable proportion (4.5%) of case patients, and it was found more frequently among case patients than control subjects (P<.02). Surprisingly, EAEC was the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in our population. EAEC was common in all age strata and was not associated with foreign travel or immunodeficiency. EAEC infection is frequently accompanied by fever and abdominal pain, though this did not happen more frequently in patients with EAEC infection than in patients with diarrhea due to other causes. Our data suggest that EAEC infection should be considered among persons with diarrhea that does not yield another known etiologic agent.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp)
                Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp)
                EUJMI
                European Journal of Microbiology & Immunology
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-509X
                2062-8633
                09 August 2017
                September 2017
                : 7
                : 3
                : 220-228
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire, d’Épidémiologie et de Surveillance des Bactéries et virus Transmissibles par les Aliments (LaBESTA)/Centre de Recherche en Sciences Biologiques, Alimentaires et Nutritionnelles (CRSBAN)/Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies (EDST)/Université Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO , 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso
                [2 ] Centre National de Recherche et de Formation sur le Paludisme (CNRFP) , 01 BP 2208 Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso
                [3 ] Centre Médical avec Antenne Chirurgicale (CMA) de Schiphra , 07 BP 5246 Ouagadougou 07, Burkina Faso
                [4 ] Laboratoire de Biochimie Hôpital National de Niamey (HNN) BP 238 , Niamey, Niger
                [5 ] Département de bactériologie et de virologie, Institut Pasteur de Côte d’Ivoire (IPCI) , 01 BP 490, Abidjan 01, Côte d’Ivoire
                [6 ] Unité de Bactériologie Expérimentale/Institut Pasteur de Dakar , BP 220 Dakar, Senegal
                Author notes
                * Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire, d’Épidémiologie et de Surveillance des Bactéries et virus Transmissibles par les Aliments (LaBESTA)/Centre de Recherche en Sciences Biologiques, Alimentaires et Nutritionnelles (CRSBAN)/Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies (EDST)/Université Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso; (+226) 73 30 00 01; zangaali@ 123456gmail.com

                + These authors contributed equally to this work.

                Article
                10.1556/1886.2017.00011
                5632749
                © 2017, The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 51, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Original Article

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