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      Formation and Rupture of the Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm after Multiple Courses of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Management of the Skull Base Ewing Sarcoma/PNET: Case Report

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          Abstract

          Background Aneurysm formation after stereotactic irradiation of skull base tumors is rare. The formation and rupture of an internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm in a patient with skull base Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), who underwent surgery followed by multiple courses of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy, is described.

          Case Description A 25-year-old man presented with a sinonasal tumor with intraorbital and intracranial growth. At that time cerebral angiography did not reveal any vascular abnormalities. The lesion was resected subtotally. Histopathologic diagnosis was Ewing sarcoma/PNET. The patient underwent multiple courses of chemotherapy and three courses of IMRT at 3, 28, and 42 months after initial surgery. The total biologically effective dose delivered to the right ICA was 220.2 Gy. Seven months after the third IMRT, the patient experienced profound nasal bleeding that resulted in hypovolemic shock. Angiography revealed a ruptured right C4–C5 aneurysm and irregular stenotic changes of the ICA. Lifesaving endovascular trapping of the right ICA was done. The patient recovered well after surgery but died due to tumor recurrence 6 months later.

          Conclusion Excessive irradiation of the ICA may occasionally result in aneurysm formation, which should be borne in mind during stereotactic irradiation of malignant skull base tumors.

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          Most cited references 23

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          The 2007 WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System

          The fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system, published in 2007, lists several new entities, including angiocentric glioma, papillary glioneuronal tumour, rosette-forming glioneuronal tumour of the fourth ventricle, papillary tumour of the pineal region, pituicytoma and spindle cell oncocytoma of the adenohypophysis. Histological variants were added if there was evidence of a different age distribution, location, genetic profile or clinical behaviour; these included pilomyxoid astrocytoma, anaplastic medulloblastoma and medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity. The WHO grading scheme and the sections on genetic profiles were updated and the rhabdoid tumour predisposition syndrome was added to the list of familial tumour syndromes typically involving the nervous system. As in the previous, 2000 edition of the WHO ‘Blue Book’, the classification is accompanied by a concise commentary on clinico-pathological characteristics of each tumour type. The 2007 WHO classification is based on the consensus of an international Working Group of 25 pathologists and geneticists, as well as contributions from more than 70 international experts overall, and is presented as the standard for the definition of brain tumours to the clinical oncology and cancer research communities world-wide.
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            Addition of ifosfamide and etoposide to standard chemotherapy for Ewing's sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone.

            Ewing's sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone are closely related, highly malignant tumors of children, adolescents, and young adults. A new drug combination, ifosfamide and etoposide, was highly effective in patients with Ewing's sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone who had a relapse after standard therapy. We designed a study to test whether the addition of these drugs to a standard regimen would improve the survival of patients with newly diagnosed disease. Patients 30 years old or younger with Ewing's sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone, or primitive sarcoma of bone were eligible. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 49 weeks of standard chemotherapy with doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin or experimental therapy with these four drugs alternating with courses of ifosfamide and etoposide. A total of 518 patients met the eligibility requirements. Of 120 patients with metastatic disease, 62 were randomly assigned to the standard-therapy group and 58 to the experimental-therapy group. There was no significant difference in five-year event-free survival between the treatment groups (P=0.81). Among the 398 patients with nonmetastatic disease, the mean (+/-SE) five-year event-free survival among the 198 patients in the experimental-therapy group was 69+/-3 percent, as compared with 54+/-4 percent among the 200 patients in the standard-therapy group (P=0.005). Overall survival was also significantly better among patients in the experimental-therapy group (72+/-3.4 percent vs. 61+/-3.6 percent in the standard-therapy group, P=0.01). The addition of ifosfamide and etoposide to a standard regimen does not affect the outcome for patients with metastatic disease, but it significantly improves the outcome for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing's sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone, or primitive sarcoma of bone. Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society
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              Current treatment protocols have eliminated the prognostic advantage of type 1 fusions in Ewing sarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

              PURPOSE Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs) exhibit chromosomal translocations that lead to the creation of chimeric fusion oncogenes. Combinatorial diversity among chromosomal breakpoints produces varying fusions. The type 1 EWS-FLI1 transcript is created as a result of fusion between exons 7 of EWS and 6 of FLI1, and retrospective studies have reported that type 1 tumors are associated with an improved outcome. We have re-examined this association in a prospective cohort of patients with ESFT treated according to current Children's Oncology Group (COG) treatment protocols. METHODS Frozen tumor tissue was prospectively obtained from patients diagnosed with ESFT, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine translocation status. Analysis was confined to patients with localized tumors who were diagnosed after 1994 and treated according to COG protocols. Translocation status was correlated with disease characteristics, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS). Results RT-PCR identified chimeric fusion oncogenes in 119 of 132 ESFTs. Eighty-nine percent of identified transcripts were EWS-FLI1, and of these, 58.8% were type 1. Five-year EFS and OS rates for patients with type 1 and non-type 1 fusions diagnosed between 2001 and 2005 were equivalent (type 1: EFS, 63% +/- 7%; OS, 83% +/- 6%; non-type 1: EFS, 71% +/- 9%; OS, 79% +/- 8%). CONCLUSION Current intensive treatment protocols for localized ESFT have erased the clinical disadvantage that was formerly observed in patients with non-type 1 EWS-FLI1 fusions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Neurol Surg Rep
                J Neurol Surg Rep
                Journal of Neurological Surgery Reports
                Georg Thieme Verlag KG (Stuttgart · New York )
                2193-6358
                2193-6366
                22 October 2013
                December 2013
                : 74
                : 2
                : 111-117
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Faculty of Advanced Techno-Surgery, Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
                [2 ]Kumamoto Radiosurgery Clinic, Kumamoto, Japan
                [3 ]Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence Manabu Tamura, MD, DMSc Faculty of Advanced Techno-Surgery, Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666Japan Tamura.Manabu@ 123456twmu.ac.jp
                Article
                120041
                10.1055/s-0033-1358379
                3836956
                © Thieme Medical Publishers
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