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      Spatial patterns of the frog Oophaga pumilio in a plantation system are consistent with conspecific attraction

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          Abstract

          The conspecific attraction hypothesis predicts that individuals are attracted to conspecifics because conspecifics may be cues to quality habitat and/or colonists may benefit from living in aggregations. Poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) are aposematic, territorial, and visually oriented—three characteristics which make dendrobatids an appropriate model to test for conspecific attraction. In this study, we tested this hypothesis using an extensive mark‐recapture dataset of the strawberry poison frog ( Oophaga pumilio) from La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Data were collected from replicate populations in a relatively homogenous Theobroma cacao plantation, which provided a unique opportunity to test how conspecifics influence the spatial ecology of migrants in a controlled habitat with homogenous structure. We predicted that (1) individuals entering a population would aggregate with resident adults, (2) migrants would share sites with residents at a greater frequency than expected by chance, and (3) migrant home ranges would have shorter nearest‐neighbor distances ( NND) to residents than expected by chance. The results were consistent with these three predictions: Relative to random simulations, we observed significant aggregation, home‐range overlap, and NND distribution functions in four, five, and six, respectively, of the six migrant–resident groups analyzed. Conspecific attraction may benefit migrant O. pumilio by providing cues to suitable home sites and/or increasing the potential for social interactions with conspecifics; if true, these benefits should outweigh the negative effects of other factors associated with aggregation. The observed aggregation between migrant and resident O. pumilio is consistent with conspecific attraction in dendrobatid frogs, and our study provides rare support from a field setting that conspecific attraction may be a relevant mechanism for models of anuran spatial ecology.

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          Most cited references 52

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          Conspecific Attraction and Aggregation in Territorial Species

           J. A. Stamps (1988)
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            CONSPECIFIC REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AND BREEDING HABITAT SELECTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDY OF COLONIALITY

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              The use of conspecific reproductive success for breeding patch selection in terrestrial migratory species

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                brian.folt@gmail.com
                Journal
                Ecol Evol
                Ecol Evol
                10.1002/(ISSN)2045-7758
                ECE3
                Ecology and Evolution
                John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
                2045-7758
                14 February 2018
                March 2018
                : 8
                : 5 ( doiID: 10.1002/ece3.2018.8.issue-5 )
                : 2880-2889
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Department of Biological Sciences and Auburn University Museum of Natural History Auburn University Auburn AL USA
                [ 2 ] Department of Biological Sciences Florida International University Miami FL USA
                Author notes
                [* ] Correspondence

                Brian Folt, Department of Biological Sciences and Auburn University Museum of Natural History, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.

                Email: brian.folt@ 123456gmail.com

                Article
                ECE33748
                10.1002/ece3.3748
                5838034
                © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

                This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Figures: 6, Tables: 0, Pages: 10, Words: 8106
                Product
                Categories
                Original Research
                Original Research
                Custom metadata
                2.0
                ece33748
                March 2018
                Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_NLMPMC version:version=5.3.2.2 mode:remove_FC converted:05.03.2018

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