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JNK1: a protein kinase stimulated by UV light and Ha-Ras that binds and phosphorylates the c-Jun activation domain.

Cell

Ultraviolet Rays, Amino Acid Sequence, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases, chemistry, Cell Line, Enzyme Activation, Humans, JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Molecular Sequence Data, Oncogene Protein p21(ras), physiology, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, genetics, metabolism, radiation effects, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, Substrate Specificity, Transcriptional Activation

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      Abstract

      The ultraviolet (UV) response of mammalian cells is characterized by a rapid and selective increase in gene expression mediated by AP-1 and NF-kappa B. The effect on AP-1 transcriptional activity results, in part, from enhanced phosphorylation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal activation domain. Here, we describe the molecular cloning and characterization of JNK1, a distant relative of the MAP kinase group that is activated by dual phosphorylation at Thr and Tyr during the UV response. Significantly, Ha-Ras partially activates JNK1 and potentiates the activation caused by UV. JNK1 binds to the c-Jun transactivation domain and phosphorylates it on Ser-63 and Ser-73. Thus, JNK1 is a component of a novel signal transduction pathway that is activated by oncoproteins and UV irradiation. These properties indicate that JNK1 activation may play an important role in tumor promotion.

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      Overlap extension represents a new approach to genetic engineering. Complementary oligodeoxyribonucleotide (oligo) primers and the polymerase chain reaction are used to generate two DNA fragments having overlapping ends. These fragments are combined in a subsequent 'fusion' reaction in which the overlapping ends anneal, allowing the 3' overlap of each strand to serve as a primer for the 3' extension of the complementary strand. The resulting fusion product is amplified further by PCR. Specific alterations in the nucleotide (nt) sequence can be introduced by incorporating nucleotide changes into the overlapping oligo primers. Using this technique of site-directed mutagenesis, three variants of a mouse major histocompatibility complex class-I gene have been generated, cloned and analyzed. Screening of mutant clones revealed at least a 98% efficiency of mutagenesis. All clones sequenced contained the desired mutations, and a low frequency of random substitution estimated to occur at approx. 1 in 4000 nt was detected. This method represents a significant improvement over standard methods of site-directed mutagenesis because it is much faster, simpler and approaches 100% efficiency in the generation of mutant product.
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        Single-step purification of polypeptides expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions with glutathione S-transferase

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          Prooxidant states and tumor promotion.

           P Cérutti (1985)
          There is convincing evidence that cellular prooxidant states--that is, increased concentrations of active oxygen and organic peroxides and radicals--can promote initiated cells to neoplastic growth. Prooxidant states can be caused by different classes of agents, including hyperbaric oxygen, radiation, xenobiotic metabolites and Fenton-type reagents, modulators of the cytochrome P-450 electron-transport chain, peroxisome proliferators, inhibitors of the antioxidant defense, and membrane-active agents. Many of these agents are promoters or complete carcinogens. They cause chromosomal damage by indirect action, but the role of this damage in carcinogenesis remains unclear. Prooxidant states can be prevented or suppressed by the enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense and low molecular weight scavenger molecules, and many antioxidants are antipromoters and anticarcinogens. Finally, prooxidant states may modulate the expression of a family of prooxidant genes, which are related to cell growth and differentiation, by inducing alterations in DNA structure or by epigenetic mechanisms, for example, by polyadenosine diphosphate-ribosylation of chromosomal proteins.
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            8137421

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