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      New Italian records of Lichenophanes varius (Illiger, 1801) (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae)

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      Nature Conservation

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Lichenophanes varius (Illiger, 1801) is a Turanic-European-Mediterranean species. In most of European countries, this species is protected at different levels and it is classified as “NT” (Near Threatened) in the IUCN European Red List of Saproxylic Beetles. In Italy, it is classified as “EN” (Endangered). Its larvae are saproxylophagous and develop in branches and rotting trunks of many broadleaved tree genera. Nevertheless, this beetle seems to attack only wood which is already invaded by the mycelia of Biscogniauxia spp. (Pyrenomycetes, Xylariaceae). The Italian distribution and ecology of L. varius are updated on the basis of recent records; the species is recorded for the first time from Calabria, where it was reared from Quercus frainetto Ten. which represent a new host-plant record for this beetle. Finally, the authors discuss the possibility that global warming can promote a resurgence of attacks from the above mentioned phytopathogenic fungi in Italian forests and, therefore, this climatic change can also favour the populations of this red-listed beetle.

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          • Record: found
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          Supporting Red List threat assessments with GeoCAT: geospatial conservation assessment tool

          Abstract GeoCAT is an open source, browser based tool that performs rapid geospatial analysis to ease the process of Red Listing taxa. Developed to utilise spatially referenced primary occurrence data, the analysis focuses on two aspects of the geographic range of a taxon: the extent of occurrence (EOO) and the area of occupancy (AOO). These metrics form part of the IUCN Red List categories and criteria and have often proved challenging to obtain in an accurate, consistent and repeatable way. Within a familiar Google Maps environment, GeoCAT users can quickly and easily combine data from multiple sources such as GBIF, Flickr and Scratchpads as well as user generated occurrence data. Analysis is done with the click of a button and is visualised instantly, providing an indication of the Red List threat rating, subject to meeting the full requirements of the criteria. Outputs including the results, data and parameters used for analysis are stored in a GeoCAT file that can be easily reloaded or shared with collaborators. GeoCAT is a first step toward automating the data handling process of Red List assessing and provides a valuable hub from which further developments and enhancements can be spawned.
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            Monitoring of the saproxylic beetle Morimus asper (Sulzer, 1776) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) with freshly cut log piles

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              Effects of trap baits and height on stag beetle and flower chafer monitoring: ecological and conservation implications

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Conservation
                NC
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-3301
                1314-6947
                July 31 2017
                July 31 2017
                : 19
                : 219-229
                Article
                10.3897/natureconservation.19.12449
                cbafde93-8b2b-4f08-b88a-a45d50b2a98a
                © 2017

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