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      The Social Web and Archaeology’s Restructuring: Impact, Exploitation, Disciplinary Change

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      Open Archaeology

      Walter de Gruyter GmbH

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          Abstract

          From blogs to crowdfunding, YouTube to LinkedIn, online photo-sharing sites to open-source community-based software projects, the social web has been a meaningful player in the development of archaeological practice for two decades now. Yet despite its myriad applications, it is still often appreciated as little more than a tool for communication, rather than a paradigm-shifting system that also shapes the questions we ask in our research, the nature and spread of our data, and the state of skill and expertise in the profession. We see this failure to critically engage with its dimensions as one of the most profound challenges confronting archaeology today. The social web is bound up in relations of power, control, freedom, labour and exploitation, with consequences that portend real instability for the cultural sector and for social welfare overall. Only a handful of archaeologists, however, are seriously debating these matters, which suggests the discipline is setting itself up to be swept away by our unreflective investment in the cognitive capitalist enterprise that marks much current web-based work. Here we review the state of play of the archaeological social web, and reflect on various conscientious activities aimed both at challenging practitioners’ current online interactions, and at otherwise situating the discipline as a more informed innovator with the social web’s possibilities.

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          DIY and digital archaeology: what are you doing to participate?

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            A new Digital Dark Age? Collaborative web tools, social media and long-term preservation

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              Antisocial media in archaeology?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Open Archaeology
                Walter de Gruyter GmbH
                2300-6560
                January 19 2015
                January 19 2015
                : 1
                : 1
                Article
                10.1515/opar-2015-0009
                © 2015

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