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      Petilla terminology: nomenclature of features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex.

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      Nature reviews. Neuroscience
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          Neuroscience produces a vast amount of data from an enormous diversity of neurons. A neuronal classification system is essential to organize such data and the knowledge that is derived from them. Classification depends on the unequivocal identification of the features that distinguish one type of neuron from another. The problems inherent in this are particularly acute when studying cortical interneurons. To tackle this, we convened a representative group of researchers to agree on a set of terms to describe the anatomical, physiological and molecular features of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex. The resulting terminology might provide a stepping stone towards a future classification of these complex and heterogeneous cells. Consistent adoption will be important for the success of such an initiative, and we also encourage the active involvement of the broader scientific community in the dynamic evolution of this project.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nat Rev Neurosci
          Nature reviews. Neuroscience
          Springer Science and Business Media LLC
          1471-0048
          1471-003X
          Jul 2008
          : 9
          : 7
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Molecular Neuroscience Department and Center for Neural Informatics, Structures, and Plasticity, Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, George Mason University, MS2A1, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, USA. ascoli@gmu.edu;
          Article
          nrn2402 NIHMS193703
          10.1038/nrn2402
          2868386
          18568015
          cc0070b9-0809-4532-a0e2-e87b94fbdca7
          History

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