3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Diversity and human perceptions of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) in Southeast Asian megacities

      , , , , , , ,

      Genome

      Canadian Science Publishing

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 73

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Effects of urbanization on species richness: A review of plants and animals

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Land Use and Avian Species Diversity Along an Urban Gradient

             Robert Blair (1996)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Socioeconomics drive urban plant diversity.

              Spatial variation in plant diversity has been attributed to heterogeneity in resource availability for many ecosystems. However, urbanization has resulted in entire landscapes that are now occupied by plant communities wholly created by humans, in which diversity may reflect social, economic, and cultural influences in addition to those recognized by traditional ecological theory. Here we use data from a probability-based survey to explore the variation in plant diversity across a large metropolitan area using spatial statistical analyses that incorporate biotic, abiotic, and human variables. Our prediction for the city was that land use, along with distance from urban center, would replace the dominantly geomorphic controls on spatial variation in plant diversity in the surrounding undeveloped Sonoran desert. However, in addition to elevation and current and former land use, family income and housing age best explained the observed variation in plant diversity across the city. We conclude that a functional relationship, which we term the "luxury effect," may link human resource abundance (wealth) and plant diversity in urban ecosystems. This connection may be influenced by education, institutional control, and culture, and merits further study.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Genome
                Genome
                Canadian Science Publishing
                0831-2796
                1480-3321
                October 2016
                October 2016
                : 59
                : 10
                : 827-839
                Article
                10.1139/gen-2015-0159
                © 2016

                Comments

                Comment on this article