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EEG-Based Control for Upper and Lower Limb Exoskeletons and Prostheses: A Systematic Review

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      Abstract

      Electroencephalography (EEG) signals have great impact on the development of assistive rehabilitation devices. These signals are used as a popular tool to investigate the functions and the behavior of the human motion in recent research. The study of EEG-based control of assistive devices is still in early stages. Although the EEG-based control of assistive devices has attracted a considerable level of attention over the last few years, few studies have been carried out to systematically review these studies, as a means of offering researchers and experts a comprehensive summary of the present, state-of-the-art EEG-based control techniques used for assistive technology. Therefore, this research has three main goals. The first aim is to systematically gather, summarize, evaluate and synthesize information regarding the accuracy and the value of previous research published in the literature between 2011 and 2018. The second goal is to extensively report on the holistic, experimental outcomes of this domain in relation to current research. It is systematically performed to provide a wealthy image and grounded evidence of the current state of research covering EEG-based control for assistive rehabilitation devices to all the experts and scientists. The third goal is to recognize the gap of knowledge that demands further investigation and to recommend directions for future research in this area.

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      Updating P300: an integrative theory of P3a and P3b.

       John Polich (2007)
      The empirical and theoretical development of the P300 event-related brain potential (ERP) is reviewed by considering factors that contribute to its amplitude, latency, and general characteristics. The neuropsychological origins of the P3a and P3b subcomponents are detailed, and how target/standard discrimination difficulty modulates scalp topography is discussed. The neural loci of P3a and P3b generation are outlined, and a cognitive model is proffered: P3a originates from stimulus-driven frontal attention mechanisms during task processing, whereas P3b originates from temporal-parietal activity associated with attention and appears related to subsequent memory processing. Neurotransmitter actions associating P3a to frontal/dopaminergic and P3b to parietal/norepinephrine pathways are highlighted. Neuroinhibition is suggested as an overarching theoretical mechanism for P300, which is elicited when stimulus detection engages memory operations.
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        Effects of robot-assisted therapy on upper limb recovery after stroke: a systematic review.

        The aim of the study was to present a systematic review of studies that investigate the effects of robot-assisted therapy on motor and functional recovery in patients with stroke. A database of articles published up to October 2006 was compiled using the following Medline key words: cerebral vascular accident, cerebral vascular disorders, stroke, paresis, hemiplegia, upper extremity, arm, and robot. References listed in relevant publications were also screened. Studies that satisfied the following selection criteria were included: (1) patients were diagnosed with cerebral vascular accident; (2) effects of robot-assisted therapy for the upper limb were investigated; (3) the outcome was measured in terms of motor and/or functional recovery of the upper paretic limb; and (4) the study was a randomized clinical trial (RCT). For each outcome measure, the estimated effect size (ES) and the summary effect size (SES) expressed in standard deviation units (SDU) were calculated for motor recovery and functional ability (activities of daily living [ADLs]) using fixed and random effect models. Ten studies, involving 218 patients, were included in the synthesis. Their methodological quality ranged from 4 to 8 on a (maximum) 10-point scale. Meta-analysis showed a nonsignificant heterogeneous SES in terms of upper limb motor recovery. Sensitivity analysis of studies involving only shoulder-elbow robotics subsequently demonstrated a significant homogeneous SES for motor recovery of the upper paretic limb. No significant SES was observed for functional ability (ADL). As a result of marked heterogeneity in studies between distal and proximal arm robotics, no overall significant effect in favor of robot-assisted therapy was found in the present meta-analysis. However, subsequent sensitivity analysis showed a significant improvement in upper limb motor function after stroke for upper arm robotics. No significant improvement was found in ADL function. However, the administered ADL scales in the reviewed studies fail to adequately reflect recovery of the paretic upper limb, whereas valid instruments that measure outcome of dexterity of the paretic arm and hand are mostly absent in selected studies. Future research into the effects of robot-assisted therapy should therefore distinguish between upper and lower robotics arm training and concentrate on kinematical analysis to differentiate between genuine upper limb motor recovery and functional recovery due to compensation strategies by proximal control of the trunk and upper limb.
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          Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

          A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Smart Assistive and Rehabilitative Technology (SMART) Research Group & Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar 32610, Malaysia; eng.mgd@ 123456gmail.com (M.S.A.-Q.); sitiasmah.daud@ 123456utp.edu.my (S.A.D.)
            [2 ]Faculty of Engineering, Thamar University, Dhamar 87246, Yemen
            [3 ]School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway 46150, Malaysia; s.parasuraman@ 123456monash.edu
            [4 ]Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Universita degli Studi di Brescia, Via Branze, 38-25123 Brescia, Italy; alberto.borboni@ 123456unibs.it
            Author notes
            [* ]Correspondence: irraivan_elamvazuthi@ 123456utp.edu.my ; Tel.: +60-5-368-7882
            Journal
            Sensors (Basel)
            Sensors (Basel)
            sensors
            Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)
            MDPI
            1424-8220
            07 October 2018
            October 2018
            : 18
            : 10
            30301238
            6211123
            10.3390/s18103342
            sensors-18-03342
            © 2018 by the authors.

            Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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