2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Population characteristics of the non-indigenous round goby, Neogobius melanostomus (Actinopterygii: Perciformes: Gobiidae), in the eastern Gulf of Finland

      , ,

      Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The round goby, Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814), is a fish of Ponto-Caspian origin that has been invading the Baltic Sea since the 1990s. Currently, it is abundant and commercially important in some areas of the sea. This species was first reported in the eastern Gulf of Finland (GoF) in 2012. Its occurrence increased thereafter, however it has remained largely unstudied in this region. The aim of this study was to investigate the population characteristics of the round goby in the eastern GoF to better understand its expansion trend and whether it will become abundant enough to be exploited by the local fishery. Fish were caught using multi-mesh gillnets (12–60 mm mesh) and a beach seine (0.5–10 mm mesh). Occurrence, density, catch per unit effort, biomass per unit effort, relative number and biomass in catches, as well as age, size and sex ratio were studied. The species regularly occurred in samplings along the southern coastline of the GoF, as well as some central areas and along the northern coast. Within 2012–2019, its occurrence in catches increased, with the highest frequency in 2015–2019 in shallow waters (<1.5 m) of Koporye Bay (70%) and in the deeper waters of Narva Bay (74%). Similarly, the highest density in the shallow waters was also observed in Koporye Bay (10.0 ind. ∙ 100 m−2), and offshore in Narva Bay. Relative abundance and biomass usually did not exceed 23%, although it reached 93% in Narva Bay. The oldest specimen was five years old. Young-of-the-year (YOY) juveniles predominated in the shallow waters (85%), while three-year-olds prevailed in deeper waters (75%). Among the fish older than two years, females were more predominant (mean ratio 3 to 1), and males were larger than females. Specimens in all life stages were found in the eastern GoF, and their abundance increased annually, suggesting that the round goby has successfully colonized this region of the Baltic Sea. However, compared to other areas of the Baltic Sea inhabited by longer-established populations, its population size is still relatively low.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Twenty years of invasion: a review of round goby Neogobius melanostomus biology, spread and ecological implications.

          The round goby Neogobius melanostomus is one of the most wide-ranging invasive fish on earth, with substantial introduced populations within the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed, the Baltic Sea and several major European rivers. Rapid expansion and deleterious ecosystem effects have motivated extensive research on this species; here this research is synthesized. Maps of the global distribution are provided and the invasion history of N. melanostomus, which spread more rapidly at first in North America, but has undergone substantial expansion over the past decade in the Baltic Sea, is summarized. Meta-analyses comparing their size at age, diet, competitors and predators in North American and European ecosystems are provided. Size at age is region specific, with saline habitats typically supporting larger and faster growing individuals than fresh water. Neogobius melanostomus prey differs substantially between regions, demonstrating a capacity to adapt to locally abundant food sources. Neogobius melanostomus comprise at least 50% of the diet of eight taxa in at least one site or life stage; in total, 16 predator taxa are documented from the Laurentian Great Lakes v. five from Eurasia. Invasive N. melanostomus are the only common forage fish to heavily exploit mussels in the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Baltic Sea, facilitating the transfer of energy from mussels to higher trophic levels in both systems. Neogobius melanostomus morphology, life history, reproduction, habitat preferences, environmental tolerances, parasites, environmental effects, sampling strategies and management are also discussed. Neogobius melanostomus inhabit a wide range of temperate freshwater and brackish-water ecosystems and will probably continue to spread via ballast water, accidental bait release and natural dispersal worldwide. Climate change will probably enhance N. melanostomus expansion by elevating water temperatures closer to its energetic optimum of 26° C. Future research needs are presented; most pressing are evaluating the economic effects of N. melanostomus invasion, determining long-term population level effects of egg predation on game-fish recruitment and comparing several variables (density, ecological effects morphology and life history) among invaded ecosystems. This review provides a central reference as researchers continue studying N. melanostomus, often as examples for advancing basic ecology and invasion biology. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The Round Goby, Neogobius melanostomus, a Fish Invader on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Fecundity and Reproductive Season of the Round GobyNeogobius melanostomusin the Upper Detroit River

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria
                AIeP
                Pensoft Publishers
                1734-1515
                0137-1592
                September 13 2021
                September 13 2021
                : 51
                : 3
                : 327-337
                Article
                10.3897/aiep.51.68601
                © 2021

                Comments

                Comment on this article