4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Preempting the Arrival of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys: Biological Control Options for Australia

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Simple Summary

          The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is native to Northeast Asia, but has become a serious invasive species in North America and Europe, causing major economic damage to crops. Halyomorpha halys has not established itself in Australia, but it has been intercepted several times at the border, therefore future incursions and establishment are likely. There are few control options for this species and biological control may be a useful management method in Australia. This study summarizes the literature on natural enemies of H. halys in its native and invaded ranges and prioritizes potential biological control agents that could be suitable for use in Australia. The results show two egg parasitoid species as the best candidates: Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead) and Trissolcus mitsukurii (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae). Because T. mitsukurii is already present in Australia, it offers the possibility of biological control that can be implemented rapidly.

          Abstract

          The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is native to Northeast Asia, but has become a serious invasive species in North America and Europe, causing major damage to crops. While it has not established itself in Australia, it has been intercepted at the border several times, indicating that future incursions and establishment are a case of when, not if. Biological control is one of the few control options for this species and will be important for managing H. halys should it become established in Australia. Prioritizing species that could be used as biological control agents would ensure Australia is prepared. This study summarizes the literature on natural enemies of H. halys in its native and invaded ranges and prioritizes potential biological control agents of H. halys that could be used in Australia. Two egg parasitoid species were identified: Trissolcus japonicus (Ashmead) and Trissolcus mitsukurii (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae). Future efforts to develop biological control should focus on T. mitsukurii, as it is already present in Australia. However, little is known about this species and further work is required to: (1) assess its potential effectiveness in parasitizing H. halys, (2) determine its current distribution and (3) host range in Australia.

          Related collections

          Most cited references106

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Review of the biology, ecology, and management of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea.

          Native to China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan, the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) was first detected in the United States in the mid-1990s. Since establishing in the United States, this invasive species has caused significant economic losses in agriculture and created major nuisance problems for home and business owners, especially in the mid-Atlantic region. Basic and applied questions on H. halys have been addressed in its native range in Asia since the mid-1900s and the research outcomes have been published in at least 216 articles from China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. In Asia, H. halys is described as an occasional or outbreak pest of a number of crops such as apple, pear, persimmon, and soybeans. This species is considered a nuisance pest as well, particularly in Japan. This review summarizes 100 articles primarily translated from Chinese, Japanese, and Korean to English. The content of this review focuses on the biology, ecology, and management of H. halys in Asia, with specific emphasis on nomenclature, life history, host range, damage, economic importance, sampling and monitoring tools, and management strategies. This information from the native range of H. halys provides greater context and understanding of its biology, ecology, and management in North America.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Biology, Ecology, and Management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Impact of the Invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in North America and Europe: History, Biology, Ecology, and Management.

              The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is an invasive pentatomid introduced from Asia into the United States, Canada, multiple European countries, and Chile. In 2010, BMSB populations in the mid-Atlantic United States reached outbreak levels and subsequent feeding severely damaged tree fruit as well as other crops. Significant nuisance issues from adults overwintering inside homes were common. BMSB is a highly polyphagous species with a strong dispersal capacity and high reproductive output, potentially enabling its spread and success in invaded regions. A greater understanding of BMSB biology and ecology and its natural enemies, the identification of the male-produced aggregation pheromone, and the recognition that BMSB disperses into crops from adjacent wooded habitats have led to the development of behavior-based integrated pest management (IPM) tactics. Much is still unknown about BMSB, and continued long-term collaborative studies are necessary to refine crop-specific IPM programs and enhance biological control across invaded landscapes.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Academic Editor
                Journal
                Insects
                Insects
                insects
                Insects
                MDPI
                2075-4450
                28 June 2021
                July 2021
                : 12
                : 7
                : 581
                Affiliations
                [1 ]CSIRO, Health and Biosecurity, Black Mountain, Acton, ACT 2601, Australia; Tania.Yonow@ 123456csiro.au
                [2 ]CSIRO, Agriculture and Food, Dutton Park, QLD 4102, Australia; Cate.Paull@ 123456csiro.au
                [3 ]Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry, Bureau of Entomology, Nematology and Plant Pathology, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA; Elijah.Talamas@ 123456fdacs.gov
                [4 ]The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Auckland 1025, New Zealand; Gonzalo.Avila@ 123456plantandfood.co.nz
                [5 ]USDA, Agriculture Research Service, Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit, Newark, DE 19713, USA; kim.hoelmer@ 123456usda.gov
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: Valerie.Caron@ 123456csiro.au ; Tel.: +61-02-6218-3475
                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3462-4607
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5584-453X
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1843-0549
                Article
                insects-12-00581
                10.3390/insects12070581
                8303127
                34203157
                cc831f30-4b50-4a5f-b79e-b217504d77aa
                © 2021 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                History
                : 22 March 2021
                : 21 June 2021
                Categories
                Article

                egg parasitoid,biocontrol,host range,scelionidae,trissolcus japonicus,trissolcus mitsukurii

                Comments

                Comment on this article