13
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      In vivo measurements of the elastic mechanical properties of human skin by indentation tests

      , ,
      Medical Engineering & Physics
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Knowledge about the human skin mechanical properties is essential in several domains, particularly for dermatology, cosmetic or to detect some cutaneous pathology. This study proposes a new method to determine the human skin mechanical properties in vivo using the indentation test. Usually, the skin mechanical parameters obtained with this method are influenced by the mechanical properties of the subcutaneous layers, like muscles. In this study, different mechanical models were used to evaluate the effect of the subcutaneous layers on the measurements and to extract the skin elastic properties from the global mechanical response. The obtained results demonstrate that it is necessary to take into account the effect of the subcutaneous layers to correctly estimate the skin Young's modulus. Moreover, the results illustrate that the variation of the measured Young's modulus at low penetration depth cannot be correctly described with usual one-layer mechanical models. Thus a two-layer elastic model was proposed, which highly improved the measurement of the skin mechanical properties.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Medical Engineering & Physics
          Medical Engineering & Physics
          Elsevier BV
          13504533
          June 2008
          June 2008
          : 30
          : 5
          : 599-606
          Article
          10.1016/j.medengphy.2007.06.011
          17869160
          ccabdbdf-52c8-493a-97fa-7337888ce94b
          © 2008

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article