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      Adapting to climate change to sustain health : Adaption to climate change

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      Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          Adaptation is necessary because climate change has gained considerable momentum. Deep cuts in emissions must be made rapidly to avoid warming of 2° above preindustrial levels but this is most unlikely, given present trends. It is possible that warming may in fact reach 4°C or more by 2100. Risks to health result principally from the effects of climate change on local food production, severity and frequency of storms and floods, threats to water supplies, and the direct effects of heat. The health sector has an important role protecting health in times of climate change. However, other sectors must be involved as well—steps taken in agriculture, urban planning, water and civil defence, for instance, will have implications for prevention of illness and injury. We offer a framework for planning adaptation, taking into account present climate-sensitive health problems, control options, and constraints. WIREs Clim Change 2011 2 271–282 DOI: 10.1002/wcc.103

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          Most cited references 46

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          Arctic sea ice decline: Faster than forecast

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            Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions.

            The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly for at least 1,000 years. Among illustrative irreversible impacts that should be expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from current levels near 385 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to a peak of 450-600 ppmv over the coming century are irreversible dry-season rainfall reductions in several regions comparable to those of the "dust bowl" era and inexorable sea level rise. Thermal expansion of the warming ocean provides a conservative lower limit to irreversible global average sea level rise of at least 0.4-1.0 m if 21st century CO(2) concentrations exceed 600 ppmv and 0.6-1.9 m for peak CO(2) concentrations exceeding approximately 1,000 ppmv. Additional contributions from glaciers and ice sheet contributions to future sea level rise are uncertain but may equal or exceed several meters over the next millennium or longer.
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              Heat Stroke

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change
                WIREs Clim Change
                Wiley
                17577780
                March 2011
                March 2011
                February 23 2011
                : 2
                : 2
                : 271-282
                Article
                10.1002/wcc.103
                © 2011

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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