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      The influence of hydrocortisone substitution on the quality of life and parameters of bone metabolism in patients with secondary hypocortisolism

      , , ,

      Clinical Endocrinology

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 19

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          Adrenal insufficiency.

           W Oelkers (1996)
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            Daily cortisol production rate in man determined by stable isotope dilution/mass spectrometry.

            Growth retardation as well as the development of Cushingoid features in adrenally insufficient patients treated with the currently accepted replacement dose of cortisol (33-41 mumol/day.m2; 12-15 mg/m2.day) prompted us to reevaluate the cortisol production rate (FPR) in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome, using a recently developed thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The stable isotope [9,12,12-2H3]cortisol was infused continuously for 31 h at about 5% of the anticipated FPR. Blood samples were obtained at 20-min intervals for 24 h, spun, and pooled in 4-h groups. Tracer dilution in plasma was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated with controlled infusions in 6 patients with adrenal insufficiency. Results from 12 normal volunteers revealed a FPR of 27.3 +/- 7.5 mumol/day (9.9 +/- 2.7 mg/day) or 15.7 mumol/day.m2; 5.7 mg/m2. day). A previously unreported circadian variation in FPR was observed. Patients with Cushing's syndrome demonstrated unequivocal elevation of FPR and cortisol concentration correlated during each sample period in normal volunteers, indicating that cortisol secretion, rather than metabolism, is mainly responsible for changes in plasma cortisol. Our data suggest that the FPR in normal subjects may be lower than previously believed.
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              The effect of long-term glucocorticoid therapy on pituitary-adrenal responses to exogenous corticotropin-releasing hormone.

              Suppression of pituitary-adrenal function is a well-known consequence of glucocorticoid therapy, manifested principally by decreased corticotropin secretion. To determine the degree of suppression of pituitary-adrenal function in patients treated with different doses of synthetic glucocorticoid medication for different periods, we measured the pituitary-adrenal response to the administration of exogenous human corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). We studied 279 patients who were receiving daily therapy with 5 to 30 mg of prednisone or its equivalent to treat various chronic diseases, principally collagen vascular disorders, and 50 normal subjects. Therapy ranged in duration from 1 week to 15 years. Stimulation tests using 100 micrograms of CRH as a bolus injection were performed in the morning, 24 hours after the most recent dose of glucocorticoids. In 61 patients an insulin hypoglycemia test, thought by many to be the reference standard, was also performed to assess the reliability of the CRH results. After the administration of CRH, 43 patients had no increase in plasma concentrations of corticotropin and cortisol. The response was blunted in 133 patients and normal in 103. There was poor correlation between the plasma cortisol response after the administration of CRH and the dose or duration of therapy or the basal plasma cortisol concentration. Although plasma cortisol concentrations after stimulation with CRH were generally lower than those after insulin administration, there was a significant correlation between the plasma cortisol responses to the two stimuli (r = 0.82). Pituitary-adrenal function in patients treated with synthetic glucocorticoids cannot be reliably estimated from the dose of glucocorticoid, the duration of therapy, or the basal plasma cortisol concentration. In such patients, testing with CRH is nearly as useful as insulin hypoglycemia testing in the assessment of pituitary-adrenal function.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Endocrinology
                Clin Endocrinol
                Wiley
                0300-0664
                1365-2265
                June 1999
                June 1999
                : 50
                : 6
                : 759-765
                Article
                10.1046/j.1365-2265.1999.00723.x
                © 1999

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