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      One side makes you taller: a mushroom–eating butterfly caterpillar (Lycaenidae) in Costa Rica

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      Neotropical Biology and Conservation

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Electrostrymon denarius is the first mushroom-feeding butterfly caterpillar discovered in the New World. It belongs to the Calycopidina, a subtribe of lycaenid butterflies whose caterpillars eat detritus and seeds in the leaf litter. Electrostrymon denarius has not been reared previously, and we illustrate and briefly describe the biology and morphology of its caterpillar and pupa. The significance of this discovery is that it increases the range of organic leaf litter substrates that Calycopidina caterpillars will eat. Increased diet breadth may decrease the likelihood of species extinction.

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          Most cited references 10

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          BUTTERFLIES AND PLANTS: A STUDY IN COEVOLUTION

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            The higher classification of the Lycaenidae (Lepidoptera): a tentative arrangement

             John Eliot (1973)
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              Butterfly feeding on lycopsid.

              Larvae of Euptychia westwoodi feed on Selaginella, a lycopsid. This is the first feeding record in the Satyrinae outside the monocotyledons and one of the few records of a butterfly feeding on other than a seed plant. Clues to possible evolutionary origins of this habit are found in the oviposition behavior of other Euptychia species.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neotropical Biology and Conservation
                NBC
                Pensoft Publishers
                2236-3777
                November 11 2020
                November 11 2020
                : 15
                : 4
                : 463-470
                Article
                10.3897/neotropical.15.e57998
                © 2020

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