0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Utility of Scanning Electron Microscopy Elemental Analysis Using the ‘NanoSuit’ Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy Method in the Diagnosis of Lanthanum Phosphate Deposition in the Esophagogastroduodenal Mucosa

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background: We have recently developed the correlative light and electron microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained glass slides using the ‘NanoSuit’ method. The aim of this study is to explore the utility of the new NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method combined with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis for the diagnosis of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the H&E-stained glass slides. Methods: Nine H&E-stained glass slides of the upper gastrointestinal tract mucosa containing the brown pigmented areas by light microscopic observation, which were suspected as lanthanum phosphate deposition, were observed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using the NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method. Results: In all nine slides, the new NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method combined with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the accumulation of both lanthanum and phosphorus in the tissue area corresponding to the brown pigment deposition. In addition to the existence of lanthanum phosphate in the stomach and duodenum, known target organs, we observed deposition in the esophagus for the first time. Furthermore, we observed lanthanum phosphate deposition in the background mucosa of stomach containing primary adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis using the NanoSuit-correlative light and electron microscopy method is useful for the diagnosis of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the H&E-stained glass slides. Lanthanum phosphate deposition occurs not only in the stomach and duodenum but also in the esophagus.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A thin polymer membrane, nano-suit, enhancing survival across the continuum between air and high vacuum.

          Most multicellular organisms can only survive under atmospheric pressure. The reduced pressure of a high vacuum usually leads to rapid dehydration and death. Here we show that a simple surface modification can render multicellular organisms strongly tolerant to high vacuum. Animals that collapsed under high vacuum continued to move following exposure of their natural extracellular surface layer (or that of an artificial coat-like polysorbitan monolaurate) to an electron beam or plasma ionization (i.e., conditions known to enhance polymer formation). Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed the existence of a thin polymerized extra layer on the surface of the animal. The layer acts as a flexible "nano-suit" barrier to the passage of gases and liquids and thus protects the organism. Furthermore, the biocompatible molecule, the component of the nano-suit, was fabricated into a "biomimetic" free-standing membrane. This concept will allow biology-related fields especially to use these membranes for several applications.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Extensive lanthanum deposition in the gastric mucosa: the first histopathological report.

            Lanthanum carbonate is one of the new phosphate binders used for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, forms insoluble complexes within the lumen, and prevents the absorption of dietary phosphate. A 63-year-old female with a 7-year history of peritoneal dialysis, who was treated with lanthanum carbonate for four years, underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for intramucosal gastric cancer. Resected specimens showed massive accumulation of macrophages containing fine, granular, brown material in the lamina propria. This was confirmed as lanthanum deposition by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Although lanthanum may be poorly absorbed, increased tissue accumulation of lanthanum, particularly in the liver and bone, has been reported in animals with chronic kidney disease. This report indicates enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of lanthanum in some patients or conditions, although its clinical significance awaits further studies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Absolute bioavailability and disposition of lanthanum in healthy human subjects administered lanthanum carbonate.

              Lanthanum carbonate [La2(CO3)3] is a noncalcium, non-aluminum phosphate binder indicated for hyperphosphatemia treatment in end-stage renal disease. A randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase I study was conducted to determine absolute bioavailability and investigate excretory routes for systemic lanthanum in healthy subjects. Twenty-four male subjects were randomized to a single lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) intravenous infusion (120 microg elemental lanthanum over a 4-hour period), a single 1-g oral dose [chewable La2(CO3)3 tablets; 4 x 250 mg elemental lanthanum], or no treatment (control). Serial blood, urine, and fecal samples were collected for 7 days postdosing. The absolute bioavailability of lanthanum [administered as La2(CO3)3] was extremely low (0.00127% +/- 0.00080%), with individual values in the range of 0.00015% to 0.00224%. Renal clearance was negligible following oral administration (1.36 +/- 1.43 mL/min). Intravenous administration confirmed low renal clearance (0.95 +/- 0.60 mL/min), just 1.7% of total plasma clearance. Fecal lanthanum excretion was not quantifiable after intravenous administration owing to high and variable background fecal lanthanum and constraints on the size of the intravenous dose. These findings demonstrate that lanthanum absorption from the intestinal tract into the systemic circulation is extremely low and that absorbed drug is cleared predominantly by nonrenal mechanisms.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Diagnostics (Basel)
                Diagnostics (Basel)
                diagnostics
                Diagnostics
                MDPI
                2075-4418
                18 December 2019
                January 2020
                : 10
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Tumor Pathology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; hisami@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (H.K.); hsugimur@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (H.S.)
                [2 ]Institute for NanoSuit Research, Preeminent Medical Photonics Education & Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; hariyama@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp
                [3 ]Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; baba@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp
                [4 ]Advanced Research Facilities and Services, Preeminent Medical Photonics Education & Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; ohtaisao@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp
                [5 ]First Department of Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; ysdh@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (H.Y.); sugimken@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (K.S.)
                [6 ]Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; 41240280@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (S.Y.); kiyoshim@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (K.M.)
                [7 ]Department of Endoscopic and Photodynamic Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; sososawa@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp
                [8 ]First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan; msnrsato@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: kzshinmu@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (K.S.); gloria@ 123456hama-med.ac.jp (H.K.); Tel.: +81-53-435-2220 (K.S.); +81-53-435-2504 (H.K.)
                [†]

                There authors contributed equally to this work.

                Article
                diagnostics-10-00001
                10.3390/diagnostics10010001
                7167806
                31861386
                © 2019 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article