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      Concomitant implantation of Impella®on top of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may improve survival of patients with cardiogenic shock : Impella®improves survival in cardiogenic shock

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          Abstract

          Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support stabilizes patients with cardiogenic shock. Despite improved oxygenation and peripheral circulation, LV unloading may be impeded due to the increased afterload, resulting in a failing static left ventricle and in high mortality.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with assisted extracorporeal life-support versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study and propensity analysis.

          Extracorporeal life-support as an adjunct to cardiac resuscitation has shown encouraging outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest. However, there is little evidence about the benefit of the procedure compared with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), especially when continued for more than 10 min. We aimed to assess whether extracorporeal CPR was better than conventional CPR for patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac origin. We did a 3-year prospective observational study on the use of extracorporeal life-support for patients aged 18-75 years with witnessed in-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac origin undergoing CPR of more than 10 min compared with patients receiving conventional CPR. A matching process based on propensity-score was done to equalise potential prognostic factors in both groups, and to formulate a balanced 1:1 matched cohort study. The primary endpoint was survival to hospital discharge, and analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00173615. Of the 975 patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest events who underwent CPR for longer than 10 min, 113 were enrolled in the conventional CPR group and 59 were enrolled in the extracorporeal CPR group. Unmatched patients who underwent extracorporeal CPR had a higher survival rate to discharge (log-rank p<0.0001) and a better 1-year survival than those who received conventional CPR (log rank p=0.007). Between the propensity-score matched groups, there was still a significant difference in survival to discharge (hazard ratio [HR] 0.51, 95% CI 0.35-0.74, p<0.0001), 30-day survival (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.28-0.77, p=0.003), and 1-year survival (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33-0.83, p=0.006) favouring extracorporeal CPR over conventional CPR. Extracorporeal CPR had a short-term and long-term survival benefit over conventional CPR in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac origin.
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            Predicting survival after ECMO for refractory cardiogenic shock: the survival after veno-arterial-ECMO (SAVE)-score.

            Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may provide mechanical pulmonary and circulatory support for patients with cardiogenic shock refractory to conventional medical therapy. Prediction of survival in these patients may assist in management of these patients and comparison of results from different centers.
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              Outcomes and long-term quality-of-life of patients supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiogenic shock.

              To assess the outcomes and long-term quality-of-life of patients supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for refractory cardiogenic shock. Refractory cardiogenic shock is almost always lethal without emergency circulatory support, e.g., ECMO. ECMO-associated morbidity and mortality plead for identification of early predictors of its failure, and detailed analyses of short- and long-term outcomes to refine patient selection and improve results. Outcomes of 81 patients given ECMO support for medical (n = 55), postcardiotomy (n = 16), or posttransplantation (n = 10) cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Thirty-four (42%) patients survived to hospital discharge; 57% suffered > or = 1 major ECMO-related complications. Independent predictors of intensive care unit death were: device insertion under cardiac massage (odds ratio [OR] = 20.68), 24 hr urine output < 500 mL (OR = 6.52), prothrombin activity < 50% (OR = 3.93), and female sex (OR = 3.89); myocarditides were associated with better outcomes (OR = .13). Sequelae and health-related quality-of-life were evaluated for 28 long-term survivors (median follow-up, 11 months), whose mean Short-Form 36 scores were significantly lower than matched healthy controls for physical role, general health, and social functioning, but higher than those reported for patients on chronic hemodialysis, with advanced heart failure, or after recovery from acute respiratory distress syndrome. ECMO support can rescue 40% of otherwise fatal cardiogenic shock patients but its initiation under cardiac massage or after renal or hepatic failure carried higher risks of intensive care unit death, while fulminant myocarditis had a better prognosis. Despite satisfactory mental health and vitality, long-term survivors' persistent physical and social problems might benefit from tailored medical or psychosocial interventions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Journal of Heart Failure
                Eur J Heart Fail
                Wiley
                13889842
                March 2017
                March 2017
                October 06 2016
                : 19
                : 3
                : 404-412
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute; Vita Salute University; Milan Italy
                [2 ]Department of General and Interventional Cardiology; University Heart Centre Hamburg Eppendorf; Hamburg Germany
                [3 ]Department of Interventional Cardiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute; Vita Salute University; Milan Italy
                [4 ]Department of Intensive Care, Centre for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; University Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf; Hamburg Germany
                [5 ]Department of Cardiac Surgery, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute; Vita Salute University; Milan Italy
                [6 ]Department of Cardiovascular Surgery; University Heart Centre Hamburg Eppendorf; Hamburg Germany
                [7 ]German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK); Partner site Hamburg/Lübeck/Kiel; Hamburg Gemany
                Article
                10.1002/ejhf.668
                27709750
                © 2016

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