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      Impact of plantar fasciitis on the quality of life of male and female patients according to the Foot Health Status Questionnaire

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          Abstract

          Background and purpose

          Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a foot disorder in adults secondary to an inflammatory response caused by repetitive micro-trauma. We evaluated and compared the impact on quality of life (QoL) related to foot health and general health between males and females with PF.

          Methods

          In this cross-sectional descriptive study, patients with PF were recruited from a podiatry clinic. Physical examination, sociodemographic data, and the self-reported Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) were recorded. The FHSQ has three sections and provides two composite scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores (close to 100) reflect better QoL related to foot health and health in general; lower scores (close to 0) denote a worse QoL related to these health items.

          Results

          One hundred patients (49 males [42.38 ± 14.065 years old] and 51 females [43.90 ± 14.305 years old]) were recruited. Section one of the FHSQ evaluates four foot domains, and significant differences ( P<0.05) were shown for foot pain and footwear, with males having higher scores than females, but not for foot function and general foot health ( P>0.05). Section two assesses four domains of general wellbeing, and significant differences ( P<0.05) were shown for overall health, physical function, social capacity, and vigor, with males having higher scores than females.

          Conclusion

          Females with PF showed a worse health-related QoL for foot pain, foot function, footwear, and general foot health than males. A better health-related QoL was also shown for males with PF than for females with regard to general health, physical activity, social capacity, and vigor.

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          Most cited references 28

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          Development and validation of a questionnaire designed to measure foot-health status.

          The aim of this study was to apply the principles of content, criterion, and construct validation to a new questionnaire specifically designed to measure foot-health status. One hundred eleven subjects completed two different questionnaires designed to measure foot health (the new Foot Health Status Questionnaire and the previously validated Foot Function Index) and underwent a clinical examination in order to provide data for a second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Presented herein is a psychometrically evaluated questionnaire that contains 13 items covering foot pain, foot function, footwear, and general foot health. The tool demonstrates a high degree of content, criterion, and construct validity and test-retest reliability.
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            Effectiveness of foot orthoses to treat plantar fasciitis: a randomized trial.

            Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot complaints. It is often treated with foot orthoses; however, studies of the effects of orthoses are generally of poor quality, and to our knowledge, no trials have investigated long-term effectiveness. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of foot orthoses in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. A pragmatic, participant-blinded, randomized trial was conducted from April 1999 to July 2001. The duration of follow-up for each participant was 12 months. One hundred and thirty-five participants with plantar fasciitis from the local community were recruited to a university-based clinic and were randomly allocated to receive a sham orthosis (soft, thin foam), a prefabricated orthosis (firm foam), or a customized orthosis (semirigid plastic). After 3 months of treatment, estimates of effects on pain and function favored the prefabricated and customized orthoses over the sham orthoses, although only the effects on function were statistically significant. Compared with sham orthoses, the mean pain score (scale, 0-100) was 8.7 points better for the prefabricated orthoses (95% confidence interval, -0.1 to 17.6; P = .05) and 7.4 points better for the customized orthoses (95% confidence interval, -1.4 to 16.2; P = .10). Compared with sham orthoses, the mean function score (scale, 0-100) was 8.4 points better for the prefabricated orthoses (95% confidence interval, 1.0-15.8; P = .03) and 7.5 points better for the customized orthoses (95% confidence interval, 0.3-14.7; P = .04). There were no significant effects on primary outcomes at the 12-month review. Foot orthoses produce small short-term benefits in function and may also produce small reductions in pain for people with plantar fasciitis, but they do not have long-term beneficial effects compared with a sham device. The customized and prefabricated orthoses used in this trial have similar effectiveness in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.
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              Diagnostic imaging for chronic plantar heel pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

              Background Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is a generalised term used to describe a range of undifferentiated conditions affecting the plantar heel. Plantar fasciitis is reported as the most common cause and the terms are frequently used interchangeably in the literature. Diagnostic imaging has been used by many researchers and practitioners to investigate the involvement of specific anatomical structures in CPHP. These observations help to explain the underlying pathology of the disorder, and are of benefit in forming an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic imaging features associated with CPHP, and evaluate study findings by meta-analysis where appropriate. Methods Bibliographic databases including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SportDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched electronically on March 25, 2009. Eligible articles were required to report imaging findings in participants with CPHP unrelated to inflammatory arthritis, and to compare these findings with a control group. Methodological quality was evaluated by use of the Quality Index as described by Downs and Black. Meta-analysis of study data was conducted where appropriate. Results Plantar fascia thickness as measured by ultrasonography was the most widely reported imaging feature. Meta-analysis revealed that the plantar fascia of CPHP participants was 2.16 mm thicker than control participants (95% CI = 1.60 to 2.71 mm, P 4.0 mm are diagnostic of plantar fasciitis. Additionally, subcalcaneal spur formation is strongly associated with pain beneath the heel.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2018
                27 April 2018
                : 11
                : 875-880
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Nursing, University Center of Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, Spain
                [2 ]School of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
                [3 ]Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain
                [4 ]Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Health, Exercise and Sport, European University of Madrid, Villaviciosa de Odón, Madrid, Spain
                [5 ]Nursing and Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of León, Ponferrada, León, Spain
                [6 ]Research, Health and Podiatry Unit, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Podiatry, Universidade da Coruña, Spain
                Author notes
                Correspondence: César Calvo-Lobo, Nursing and Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED), Faculty of Health Sciences, University of León, Av Astorga, s/n, 24401 Ponferrada, León, Spain, Email ccall@ 123456unileon.es
                Article
                jpr-11-875
                10.2147/JPR.S159918
                5931202
                © 2018 Palomo-López et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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