1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Linfoma de células B de la zona marginal extranodal del tejido linfoide asociado a mucosas (malt) primario de esófago: Presentación de un caso

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          El tracto gastrointestinal es la localización mas frecuente de los linfomas no Hodgkin extranodales, sin embargo, el compromiso del esófago es extremadamente raro, con una incidencia menor del 1% de todos los pacientes con linfoma. Se ha descrito con mayor frecuencia afectación secundaria del esófago como parte de un compromiso extenso de un linfoma gástrico o mediastinal. Se presenta el caso de paciente femenina, de 59 años de edad, con síntomas dispépticos de 2 meses de evolución. En la Endoscopia Digestiva Superior (EDS) se evidencia en tercio distal de esófago, lesión elevada, de 1cm de diámetro, con características similares al resto de la mucosa, móvil. La biopsia Endoscópica revela la presencia de un linfoma MALT de bajo grado confirmado por inmunohistoquímica. Se indicó tratamiento de erradicación para H pylori, y los estudios de extensión fueron normales. Posteriormente se realizó resección mucosal endoscópica, donde se observaron grupos aislados de linfocitos neoplásicos, con bordes de resección libres. Paciente con seguimiento endoscópico normal. Pocos casos han sido reportados en la literatura acerca de linfomas MALT de esófago, por lo tanto las características clínicas y biológicas de estos linfomas no están claramente establecidas. Es necesario el estudio y seguimiento de estos casos, para determinar los posibles factores de riesgo y así aplicar las medidas preventivas.

          Translated abstract

          The gastrointestinal tract is the most common extra nodal site involved in Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, esophageal involvement is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of patients with lymphoma. It has been described that esophageal involvement in lymphoma is more often a result of contiguous spread from mediastinal lymph nodes or from an extended gastric lymphoma. A 59 year old female consulted for dyspeptic symptoms. Endoscopic examination revealed a small submucosal mass, that measured 1 cm located at the lower thoracic esophagus. The biopsy reported a Malt lymphoma that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. She received therapy for H. pylori eradication. Endoscopic mucosal resection was performed, and isolated groups of atypical lymphocytes were found, with free resection margins. Endoscopic follow up has been normal. Few cases have been reported in literature, therefore biological and clinical characteristics of MALT lymphoma of the esophagus are currently unknown, further study is needed to establish risk factors in order to be able to take preventive measures.

          Related collections

          Most cited references25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The epidemiology of cancer of the small bowel.

          Despite its anatomical location between two regions of high cancer risk, the small bowel rarely develops a malignant tumor. However, in recent years, small bowel cancer incidence rates have begun to rise. The purpose of this review is to explore the descriptive and analytic epidemiology of small bowel cancer for those factors that protect this organ and those factors associated with loss of this protection. Within the small intestine, the sites at the highest risk are the duodenum, for adenocarcinomas, and the ileum, for carcinoids and lymphomas. In industrialized countries, small bowel cancers are predominantly adenocarcinomas; in developing countries, lymphomas are much more common. The incidence of small bowel cancer rises with age and has generally been higher among males than among females. The risk factors for small bowel cancer include dietary factors similar to those implicated in large bowel cancer, cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and other medical conditions, including Crohn's disease, familial adenomatous polyposis, cholecystectomy, peptic ulcer disease, and cystic fibrosis. The protective factors may include rapid cell turnover, a general absence of bacteria, an alkaline environment, and low levels of activating enzymes of precarcinogens. Adenocarcinomas of the small and large bowel are similar in risk factors and geographic distribution but not in recent time trends; colorectal cancer incidence rates in the United States have been falling since the mid-1980s. Small bowel lymphoma may be associated with infectious agents, such as HIV. Given the differences in anatomic and geographic location among histological subtypes, much may be learned from well-designed, histology-specific epidemiological and genetic studies of cancer of the small bowel.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Gastrointestinal lymphoma in adults: clinical features and management of 300 cases.

            Gastrointestinal lymphoma is a rare disease. A study was conducted to assess its prevalence and clinical features in adult patients with lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of 1352 patients with adult non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed 300 (22%) cases with gastrointestinal involvement at initial presentation. Of the 185 patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma, 94 (51%) had gastric primary lymphoma and the rest (49%) had a lymphoma of intestinal origin. Patients with intestinal lymphoma were considerably younger (median age, 35.0 years), frequently had multifocal disease (14%), and had a 10-year survival rate of 48%. Cases with gastric primary lymphoma had a median age of 54.5 years (P < 0.001) and rarely had multifocal disease (1%; P < 0.001) but had an equal 10-year survival rate of 53% (P = 0.431). For both groups, the combined surgical resection followed by chemotherapy led to better 10-year survival (45%) compared with either modality used alone (0% and 35%, respectively; P < 0.05). Better survival was also noted in ambulatory patients, younger patients, those with localized disease, and those without intestinal perforation. Another 115 patients had gastrointestinal involvement secondary to disseminated disease with frequent high-grade histology (29%) and a poor 10-year survival rate of 22%. Gastrointestinal involvement is relatively common in patients with adult lymphoma. Multimodality treatment appeared superior to therapy with either surgery or chemotherapy used alone.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract.

              Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract accounts for 4% to 20% of all NHLs and is the most common extranodal site of presentation. The stomach is the major organ involved by GI lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori infection, immunosuppression after solid-organ transplantation, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may be risk factors for GI lymphoma. A significant proportion of gastric lymphomas are of low-grade histology and arise from mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Such MALT lymphomas may be associated with H. pylori infection and may undergo complete regression following eradication of H. pylori. Lymphoma of the small bowel, colon, and rectum may also occur, but are less common than gastric lymphoma. Distinct clinicopathologic entities, such as primary intestinal T-cell lymphoma, immunoproliferative small intestinal disease, and multiple lymphomatous polyposis have been described. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have been used in the treatment of GI lymphomas. However, the optimal management of these lymphomas has never been determined by prospective randomized clinical trials. Such trials by cooperative groups are needed to answer many of the vital unanswered questions concerning extranodal lymphomas of the GI tract.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                gen
                Gen
                Gen
                Sociedad Venezolana de Gastroentereología (Caracas )
                0016-3503
                March 2007
                : 61
                : 1
                : 55-57
                Affiliations
                [1 ] C.C.C..G. Dr. Luis E. Anderson
                [2 ] C.C.C..G. Dr. Luis E. Anderson
                [3 ] C.C.C.. G Dr. Luis E. Anderson
                [4 ] Universidad de Pamplona
                [5 ] NOVAPATH
                Article
                S0016-35032007000100011
                cde43188-049b-4852-b23a-a32f4e8242d9

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History
                Product

                SciELO Venezuela

                Self URI (journal page): http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_serial&pid=0016-3503&lng=en

                MALT,Lymphoma,Esophagus,Linfoma,Esófago
                MALT, Lymphoma, Esophagus, Linfoma, Esófago

                Comments

                Comment on this article