30
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Gluteofemoral body fat as a determinant of metabolic health

      , ,

      International Journal of Obesity

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Body fat distribution is an important metabolic and cardiovascular risk factor, because the proportion of abdominal to gluteofemoral body fat correlates with obesity-associated diseases and mortality. Here, we review the evidence and possible mechanisms that support a specific protective role of gluteofemoral body fat. Population studies show that an increased gluteofemoral fat mass is independently associated with a protective lipid and glucose profile, as well as a decrease in cardiovascular and metabolic risk. Studies of adipose tissue physiology in vitro and in vivo confirm distinct properties of the gluteofemoral fat depot with regards to lipolysis and fatty acid uptake: in day-to-day metabolism it appears to be more passive than the abdominal depot and it exerts its protective properties by long-term fatty acid storage. Further, a beneficial adipokine profile is associated with gluteofemoral fat. Leptin and adiponectin levels are positively associated with gluteofemoral fat while the level of inflammatory cytokines is negatively associated. Finally, loss of gluteofemoral fat, as observed in Cushing's syndrome and lipodystrophy is associated with an increased metabolic and cardiovascular risk. This underlines gluteofemoral fat's role as a determinant of health by the long-term entrapment of excess fatty acids, thus protecting from the adverse effects associated with ectopic fat deposition.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 101

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          cDNA cloning and expression of a novel adipose specific collagen-like factor, apM1 (AdiPose Most abundant Gene transcript 1).

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Intracellular signalling pathways activated by leptin.

            Leptin is a versatile 16 kDa peptide hormone, with a tertiary structure resembling that of members of the long-chain helical cytokine family. It is mainly produced by adipocytes in proportion to fat size stores, and was originally thought to act only as a satiety factor. However, the ubiquitous distribution of OB-R leptin receptors in almost all tissues underlies the pleiotropism of leptin. OB-Rs belong to the class I cytokine receptor family, which is known to act through JAKs (Janus kinases) and STATs (signal transducers and activators of transcription). The OB-R gene is alternatively spliced to produce at least five isoforms. The full-length isoform, OB-Rb, contains intracellular motifs required for activation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway, and is considered to be the functional receptor. Considerable evidence for systemic effects of leptin on body mass control, reproduction, angiogenesis, immunity, wound healing, bone remodelling and cardiovascular function, as well as on specific metabolic pathways, indicates that leptin operates both directly and indirectly to orchestrate complex pathophysiological processes. Consistent with leptin's pleiotropic role, its participation in and crosstalk with some of the main signalling pathways, including those involving insulin receptor substrates, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase B, protein kinase C, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphodiesterase, phospholipase C and nitric oxide, has been observed. The impact of leptin on several equally relevant signalling pathways extends also to Rho family GTPases in relation to the actin cytoskeleton, production of reactive oxygen species, stimulation of prostaglandins, binding to diacylglycerol kinase and catecholamine secretion, among others.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Guidelines for healthy weight.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Obesity
                Int J Obes
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0307-0565
                1476-5497
                June 2010
                January 12 2010
                June 2010
                : 34
                : 6
                : 949-959
                Article
                10.1038/ijo.2009.286
                20065965
                © 2010

                Comments

                Comment on this article