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      A comparison of embalming fluids on the structures and properties of tissue in human cadavers

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          Most cited references 24

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          Human body preservation - old and new techniques.

           Erich Brenner (2014)
          This review deals with the art of (anatomical) embalming. The first part contains a brief historical review of the history of embalming, starting with ancient cultures such as the Egyptians and the lesser known Chinchorro culture, then going down the centuries and describing the anatomical techniques developed over the last two centuries. The second part deals in detail with the chemicals used for embalming purposes. The third part deals with several approaches to evaluating embalming methods, their suitability for biomechanical testing, antimicrobial properties, histological appearance, and usability. The fourth and final part analyze the European Biocidal Products Directive (98/8/EC) in the light of embalming. © 2014 Anatomical Society.
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            Die Konservierung ganzer Leichen in natürlichen Farben

             Walter Thiel (1992)
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              From formalin to Thiel embalming: What changes? One anatomy department's experiences.

               Don Lamb,  A R Soames,  R Eisma (2013)
              In 2009, the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification started Thiel embalming on a small scale to assess (i) the suitability for our current teaching in which long-lasting dissection courses are key, (ii) the potential for new collaborations and activities, and (iii) the practical implications of changing our embalming method from formalin to Thiel. Twenty six Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been used for dissection by staff and students on a taught MSc course, as a model for clinical and surgical training, and increasingly as a model for evaluation of new medical devices and procedures. Our experiences with dissection were mostly positive especially for teaching the musculoskeletal system. Internal organs handle differently from formalin-fixed organs and dissection manuals need to be adjusted to reflect this. Durability of the cadavers was not an issue, though changes are seen over time due to gradual fluid loss. We have started new collaborations related to postgraduate anatomy teaching and advanced training in surgical and clinical skills. In general, feedback is very positive and demand for cadavers outstrips our current limited supply. Thiel-embalmed cadavers were found to provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of medical products especially in areas where no suitable alternative model is available, and without the complications associated with clinical testing. This has resulted in new collaborations and research projects. As a result Thiel-embalmed cadavers are used for longer and for more activities than formalin cadavers: this requires changes in our procedures and staff roles. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia
                Anat Histol Embryol
                Wiley
                03402096
                January 2019
                January 2019
                November 18 2018
                : 48
                : 1
                : 64-73
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience; University College Cork; Cork Ireland
                [2 ]Department of Radiology; Cork University Hospital; Cork Ireland
                [3 ]Centre for Gerontology and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine; University College Cork; Ireland
                Article
                10.1111/ahe.12412
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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