1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Is Envy Always Bad? An Examination of Benign and Malicious Envy in the Workplace

      1 , 1
      Psychological Reports
      SAGE Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The current study investigated workplace envy by exploring if perceived self-efficacy of negative and positive emotions could predict malicious or benign envy. This study also examined how malicious and benign envy relate to two important organizational outcomes: job engagement and turnover intentions. Malicious envy is typically associated with negative emotions toward the target of comparison as well as negative behavioral outcomes, whereas benign envy is typically associated with positive emotions toward the target of comparison as well as positive behavioral outcomes. A total of 80 participants completed multiple measures gauging the variables of interest in this study. Results were mixed: Although both dimensions of emotional self-efficacy significantly and positively predicted benign envy, neither dimension significantly predicted malicious envy. Additionally, benign envy significantly and positively predicted job engagement, and malicious envy significantly and positively predicted turnover intention. Both effects were practically significant. However, benign envy did not negatively predict turnover intention, and malicious envy did not negatively predict job engagement. Although these results did not confirm all hypothesized relationships, they demonstrate the complexity of envy as a construct, supporting its multidimensional nature. Our findings also provide further insight into the predictors and outcomes of benign and malicious envy in the workplace.

          Related collections

          Most cited references32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Sources of method bias in social science research and recommendations on how to control it.

            Despite the concern that has been expressed about potential method biases, and the pervasiveness of research settings with the potential to produce them, there is disagreement about whether they really are a problem for researchers in the behavioral sciences. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore the current state of knowledge about method biases. First, we explore the meaning of the terms "method" and "method bias" and then we examine whether method biases influence all measures equally. Next, we review the evidence of the effects that method biases have on individual measures and on the covariation between different constructs. Following this, we evaluate the procedural and statistical remedies that have been used to control method biases and provide recommendations for minimizing method bias.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              PSYCHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF PERSONAL ENGAGEMENT AND DISENGAGEMENT AT WORK.

              W. A. Kahn (1990)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Psychological Reports
                Psychol Rep
                SAGE Publications
                0033-2941
                1558-691X
                November 07 2022
                : 003329412211384
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Psychology, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, USA
                Article
                10.1177/00332941221138476
                ce8f715a-322e-41dd-b5a3-71ecbc5cac83
                © 2022

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article