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      Achieving Effective Remote Working During the COVID‐19 Pandemic: A Work Design Perspective

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          Abstract

          Existing knowledge on remote working can be questioned in an extraordinary pandemic context. We conducted a mixed‐methods investigation to explore the challenges experienced by remote workers at this time, as well as what virtual work characteristics and individual differences affect these challenges. In Study 1, from semi‐structured interviews with Chinese employees working from home in the early days of the pandemic, we identified four key remote work challenges (work‐home interference, ineffective communication, procrastination, and loneliness), as well as four virtual work characteristics that affected the experience of these challenges (social support, job autonomy, monitoring, and workload) and one key individual difference factor (workers’ self‐discipline). In Study 2, using survey data from 522 employees working at home during the pandemic, we found that virtual work characteristics linked to worker's performance and well‐being via the experienced challenges. Specifically, social support was positively correlated with lower levels of all remote working challenges; job autonomy negatively related to loneliness; workload and monitoring both linked to higher work‐home interference; and workload additionally linked to lower procrastination. Self‐discipline was a significant moderator of several of these relationships. We discuss the implications of our research for the pandemic and beyond.

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          Common method biases in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended remedies.

          Interest in the problem of method biases has a long history in the behavioral sciences. Despite this, a comprehensive summary of the potential sources of method biases and how to control for them does not exist. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results, identify potential sources of method biases, discuss the cognitive processes through which method biases influence responses to measures, evaluate the many different procedural and statistical techniques that can be used to control method biases, and provide recommendations for how to select appropriate procedural and statistical remedies for different types of research settings.
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            THE ESSENTIAL IMPACT OF CONTEXT ON ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR.

            T G Johns (2006)
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              The revised UCLA Loneliness Scale: concurrent and discriminant validity evidence.

              The development of an adequate assessment instrument is a necessary prerequisite for social psychological research on loneliness. Two studies provide methodological refinement in the measurement of loneliness. Study 1 presents a revised version of the self-report UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) Loneliness Scale, designed to counter the possible effects of response bias in the original scale, and reports concurrent validity evidence for the revised measure. Study 2 demonstrates that although loneliness is correlated with measures of negative affect, social risk taking, and affiliative tendencies, it is nonetheless a distinct psychological experience.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                s.parker@curtin.edu.au
                Journal
                Appl Psychol
                Appl Psychol
                10.1111/(ISSN)1464-0597
                APPS
                Applied Psychology = Psychologie Appliquee
                John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
                0269-994X
                1464-0597
                05 November 2020
                : 10.1111/apps.12290
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Shanghai University Shanghai China
                [ 2 ] Curtin University Perth Western Australia 6000 Australia
                [ 3 ] Beijing Normal University Beijing 100875 China
                Author notes
                [*] [* ] Address for correspondence: Sharon K. Parker, Centre for Transformative Work Design, Future of Work Institute, Faculty of Business and Law, Curtin University, Australia. Email: s.parker@ 123456curtin.edu.au

                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9459-1328
                https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0978-1873
                Article
                APPS12290
                10.1111/apps.12290
                7675760
                33230359
                ce9c2445-747c-4df7-838e-37fc15e16ffb
                © 2020 International Association of Applied Psychology

                This article is being made freely available through PubMed Central as part of the COVID-19 public health emergency response. It can be used for unrestricted research re-use and analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source, for the duration of the public health emergency.

                History
                : 14 June 2020
                : 28 September 2020
                : 05 October 2020
                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 6, Pages: 44, Words: 32682
                Funding
                Funded by: National Natural Science Foundation of China , open-funder-registry 10.13039/501100001809;
                Award ID: 71672012
                Funded by: Curtin International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (CIPRS) and Research Stipend Scholarship
                Funded by: Australian Research Council , open-funder-registry 10.13039/501100000923;
                Award ID: FL160100033
                Categories
                Special Issue
                Special Issues
                Custom metadata
                2.0
                corrected-proof
                Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_JATSPMC version:5.9.4 mode:remove_FC converted:19.11.2020

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