0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Longitudinal evolution of non-motor symptoms in early Parkinson’s disease: a 3-year prospective cohort study

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The progression of global non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Chinese patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) has not been explored. We aimed to examine the longitudinal evolution of overall NMS in a 3-year prospective Chinese cohort with early-stage PD. We included 224 patients with early PD who underwent annual evaluation of motor and non-motor symptoms. NMS was assessed using the non-motor symptoms scale (NMSS). We observed an increased number of NMS in the majority of the NMSS domains except mood/apathy and sexual dysfunctions. Significant deterioration was observed in the sleep/fatigue, perceptual problems/hallucinations, attention/memory, gastrointestinal, urinary, and miscellaneous domains during the follow-up ( P < 0.05). Notably, the number and the score of sexual dysfunctions decreased with the progression of the disease. All NMSS domains showed a small effect size from baseline to 1-, 2-, and 3-year follow-ups (effect size < 0.5). The generalized estimating equations model indicated that the total number of NMS was significantly associated with age and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score ( P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression indicated that a high number of NMS at baseline was associated with a 3-point, a 6-point, and a 9-point increase in the UPDRS III score from baseline to 1-year (odds ratio [OR] 1.074, P = 0.017), 2-year (OR 1.113, P = 0.001), and 3-year (OR 1.117, P < 0.001), respectively. Our study indicated that overall NMS evolution in early PD is mild and multidimensional; a high NMS burden in early PD predicts the faster motor progression of PD. Our study is helpful for understanding the longitudinal evolution of NMS in PD.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, MoCA: a brief screening tool for mild cognitive impairment.

          To develop a 10-minute cognitive screening tool (Montreal Cognitive Assessment, MoCA) to assist first-line physicians in detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical state that often progresses to dementia. Validation study. A community clinic and an academic center. Ninety-four patients meeting MCI clinical criteria supported by psychometric measures, 93 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score > or =17), and 90 healthy elderly controls (NC). The MoCA and MMSE were administered to all participants, and sensitivity and specificity of both measures were assessed for detection of MCI and mild AD. Using a cutoff score 26, the MMSE had a sensitivity of 18% to detect MCI, whereas the MoCA detected 90% of MCI subjects. In the mild AD group, the MMSE had a sensitivity of 78%, whereas the MoCA detected 100%. Specificity was excellent for both MMSE and MoCA (100% and 87%, respectively). MCI as an entity is evolving and somewhat controversial. The MoCA is a brief cognitive screening tool with high sensitivity and specificity for detecting MCI as currently conceptualized in patients performing in the normal range on the MMSE.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a clinico-pathological study of 100 cases.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Parkinsonism: onset, progression, and mortality

               M Hoehn,  M Yahr (1967)
              Neurology, 17(5), 427-427
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                hfshang2002@126.com
                Journal
                NPJ Parkinsons Dis
                NPJ Parkinsons Dis
                NPJ Parkinson's Disease
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2373-8057
                15 July 2021
                15 July 2021
                2021
                : 7
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.13291.38, ISNI 0000 0001 0807 1581, Department of Neurology, Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Geriatrics, West China Hospital, , Sichuan University, ; Chengdu, Sichuan China
                Article
                207
                10.1038/s41531-021-00207-5
                8282608
                34267217
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: 1.3.5 project for disciplines of excellence, West China Hospital, Sichuan University (ZYJC18038)
                Funded by: National Science Fund of China (Grant No. 81901293) China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No: 2019M653426) Post-Doctor Research Project, West China Hospital, Sichuan University (Grant No. 2019HXBH030)
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                neurology, parkinson's disease

                Comments

                Comment on this article