2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Selenium in global food systems

      British Journal of Nutrition

      CABI Publishing

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Food systems need to produce enough of the essential trace element Se to provide regular adult intakes of at least 40 μg/d to support the maximal expression of the Se enzymes, and perhaps as much as 300 μg/d to reduce risks of cancer. Deprivation of Se is associated with impairments in antioxidant protection, redox regulation and energy production as consequences of suboptimal expression of one or more of the Se-containing enzymes. These impairments may not cause deficiency signs in the classical sense, but instead contribute to health problems caused by physiological and environmental oxidative stresses and infections. At the same time, supranutritional intakes of Se, i.e. intakes greater than those required for selenocysteine enzyme expression, appear to reduce cancer risk. The lower, nutritional, level is greater than the typical intakes of many people in several parts of the world, and few populations have intakes approaching the latter, supranutritional, level. Accordingly, low Se status is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality due to infectious as well as chronic diseases, and increasing Se intakes in all parts of the world can be expected to reduce cancer rates.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 308

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          SELENIUM AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF FACTOR 3 AGAINST DIETARY NECROTIC LIVER DEGENERATION

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            SELENIUM IN HIGHER PLANTS.

            Plants vary considerably in their physiological response to selenium (Se). Some plant species growing on seleniferous soils are Se tolerant and accumulate very high concentrations of Se (Se accumulators), but most plants are Se nonaccumulators and are Se-sensitive. This review summarizes knowledge of the physiology and biochemistry of both types of plants, particularly with regard to Se uptake and transport, biochemical pathways of assimilation, volatilization and incorporation into proteins, and mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance. Molecular approaches are providing new insights into the role of sulfate transporters and sulfur assimilation enzymes in selenate uptake and metabolism, as well as the question of Se essentiality in plants. Recent advances in our understanding of the plant's ability to metabolize Se into volatile Se forms (phytovolatilization) are discussed, along with the application of phytoremediation for the cleanup of Se contaminated environments.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Nutrition Intervention Trials in Linxian, China: Supplementation With Specific Vitamin/Mineral Combinations, Cancer Incidence, and Disease-Specific Mortality in the General Population

               W J Blot,  J-Y Li,  P R Taylor (1993)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                British Journal of Nutrition
                Br J Nutr
                CABI Publishing
                0007-1145
                1475-2662
                May 2001
                March 09 2007
                May 2001
                : 85
                : 5
                : 517-547
                Article
                10.1079/BJN2000280
                © 2001

                Comments

                Comment on this article