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      Off-Pump versus On-Pump Coronary-Artery Bypass Grafting in Elderly Patients

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          Abstract

          The benefits of coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) without cardiopulmonary bypass in the elderly are still undetermined. We randomly assigned patients 75 years of age or older who were scheduled for elective first-time CABG to undergo the procedure either without cardiopulmonary bypass (off-pump CABG) or with it (on-pump CABG). The primary end point was a composite of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, repeat revascularization, or new renal-replacement therapy at 30 days and at 12 months after surgery. A total of 2539 patients underwent randomization. At 30 days after surgery, there was no significant difference between patients who underwent off-pump surgery and those who underwent on-pump surgery in terms of the composite outcome (7.8% vs. 8.2%; odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71 to 1.28; P=0.74) or four of the components (death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or new renal-replacement therapy). Repeat revascularization occurred more frequently after off-pump CABG than after on-pump CABG (1.3% vs. 0.4%; odds ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.03 to 5.72; P=0.04). At 12 months, there was no significant between-group difference in the composite end point (13.1% vs. 14.0%; hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.16; P=0.48) or in any of the individual components. Similar results were obtained in a per-protocol analysis that excluded the 177 patients who crossed over from the assigned treatment to the other treatment. In patients 75 years of age or older, there was no significant difference between on-pump and off-pump CABG with regard to the composite outcome of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, repeat revascularization, or new renal-replacement therapy within 30 days and within 12 months after surgery. (Funded by Maquet; GOPCABE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00719667.).

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          Most cited references 12

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              Off-Pump coronary artery bypass surgery is associated with worse arterial and saphenous vein graft patency and less effective revascularization: Results from the Veterans Affairs Randomized On/Off Bypass (ROOBY) trial.

              The Department of Veterans Affairs Randomized On/Off Bypass (ROOBY) trial compared clinical and angiographic outcomes in off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery to ascertain the relative efficacy of the 2 techniques. From February 2002 to May 2007, the ROOBY trial randomized 2203 patients to off-pump versus on-pump CABG. Follow-up angiography was obtained in 685 off-pump (62%) and 685 on-pump (62%) patients. Angiograms were analyzed (blinded to treatment) for FitzGibbon classification (A=widely patent, B=flow limited, O=occluded) and effective revascularization. Effective revascularization was defined as follows: All 3 major coronary territories with significant disease were revascularized by a FitzGibbon A-quality graft to the major diseased artery, and there were no new postanastomotic lesions. Off-pump CABG resulted in lower FitzGibbon A patency rates than on-pump CABG for arterial conduits (85.8% versus 91.4%; P=0.003) and saphenous vein grafts (72.7% versus 80.4%; P<0.001). Fewer off-pump patients were effectively revascularized (50.1% versus 63.9% on-pump; P<0.001). Within each major coronary territory, effective revascularization was worse off pump than on pump (all P≤0.001). The 1-year adverse cardiac event rate was 16.4% in patients with ineffective revascularization versus 5.9% in patients with effective revascularization (P<0.001). Off-pump CABG resulted in significantly lower FitzGibbon A patency for arterial and saphenous vein graft conduits and less effective revascularization than on-pump CABG. At 1 year, patients with less effective revascularization had higher adverse event rates. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00032630.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                New England Journal of Medicine
                N Engl J Med
                Massachusetts Medical Society
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                March 28 2013
                March 28 2013
                : 368
                : 13
                : 1189-1198
                Article
                10.1056/NEJMoa1211666
                23477657
                © 2013
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