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      Investing in the Future: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Mentorship Networks for Residents

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          Abstract

          Background: Formal mentorship plays a key career development role in medicine. Traditional mentorship consists of dyadic relationships between mentors and their mentees. However, research favours utilization of mentorship networks involving individuals at multiple levels.Objective: This study aimed to rigorously evaluate a formalized mentorship network program within a Canadian Internal Medicine residency program from 2012 to 2013.Methods: Residents participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews at baseline and after one year of participation in the mentorship network. Closed-ended surveys assessed affective organizational commitment, self-efficacy, career satisfaction and overall wellness among residents and faculty members. 89 residents and 28 faculty members were invited to participate; 40 residents and 18 faculty members completed the survey after one year.Results: Residents perceived mentorship networks to add value across multiple domains, including self-awareness, overall efficiency, and physician wellness. Satisfaction with the program was very high, with 98% (n = 39/40) of residents and 89% of faculty members (n = 16/18) wanting the program to continue after year one. Male mentors were more likely to report benefits from serving as a mentor than their female counterparts. In contrast to this, female mentees found mentorship more useful than male mentees.Conclusions: Network mentorship is associated with personal and system benefits, though these benefits are difficult to quantify. The network model is feasible and well-received by mentors and mentees. Further research considering both short- and long-term endpoints is required to delineate the true cost-benefit ratio of mentorship programs to both mentors and mentees.

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          Most cited references20

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          How does burnout affect physician productivity? A systematic literature review

          Background Interest in the well-being of physicians has increased because of their contributions to the healthcare system quality. There is growing recognition that physicians are exposed to workplace factors that increase the risk of work stress. Long-term exposure to high work stress can result in burnout. Reports from around the world suggest that about one-third to one-half of physicians experience burnout. Understanding the outcomes associated with burnout is critical to understanding its affects on the healthcare system. Productivity outcomes are among those that could have the most immediate effects on the healthcare system. This systematic literature review is one of the first to explore the evidence for the types of physician productivity outcomes associated with physician burnout. It answers the question, “How does burnout affect physician productivity?” Methods A systematic search was performed of: Medline Current, Medline in process, PsycInfo, Embase and Web of Science. The search period covered 2002 to 2012. The searches identified articles about practicing physicians working in civilian settings. Articles that primarily looked only at residents or medical students were excluded. Productivity was captured by hours worked, patients seen, sick leave, leaving the profession, retirement, workload and presenteeism. Studies also were excluded if: (1) the study sample was not comprised of at least 50% physicians, (2) the study did not examine the relationship between burnout and productivity or (3) a validated measure of burnout was not used. Results The search identified 870 unique citations; 5 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. This review indicates that globally there is recognition of the potential impact of physician burnout on productivity. Productivity was examined using: number of sick leave days, work ability, intent to either continue practicing or change jobs. The majority of the studies indicate there is a negative relationship between burnout and productivity. However, there is variation depending on the type of productivity outcome examined. Conclusions There is evidence that burnout is associated with decreased productivity. However, this line of inquiry is still developing. A number of gaps are yet to be filled including understanding how to quantify the changes in productivity related to burnout.
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            Barriers to Mentoring: The Female Manager's Dilemma

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              Commitment to organizations and occupations: Extension and test of a three-component conceptualization.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
                Can Journ Gen Int Med
                Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
                2369-1778
                1911-1606
                June 25 2018
                June 25 2018
                : 13
                : 2
                : 6-23
                Article
                10.22374/cjgim.v13i2.228
                cf871100-b252-4855-89be-8649dd2059e5
                © 2018

                Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/


                General medicine,Geriatric medicine,Neurology,Internal medicine
                General medicine, Geriatric medicine, Neurology, Internal medicine

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