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      Mechanisms of mindfulness

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          Abstract

          Recently, the psychological construct mindfulness has received a great deal of attention. The majority of research has focused on clinical studies to evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions. This line of research has led to promising data suggesting mindfulness-based interventions are effective for treatment of both psychological and physical symptoms. However, an equally important direction for future research is to investigate questions concerning mechanisms of action underlying mindfulness-based interventions. This theoretical paper proposes a model of mindfulness, in an effort to elucidate potential mechanisms to explain how mindfulness affects positive change. Potential implications and future directions for the empirical study of mechanisms involved in mindfulness are addressed. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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          Most cited references 8

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          Beliefs about Worry and Intrusions: The Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire and its Correlates

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            Teasdale's differential activation hypothesis: implications for mechanisms of depressive relapse and suicidal behaviour.

            Teasdale's differential activation hypothesis (DAH) has been proposed as one account of cognitive vulnerability to depression. This view holds that important factors determining whether one's initial depression becomes more severe or persistent are the degree of activation, and content, of negative thinking patterns that become accessible in the depressed state. This phenomenon has been referred to as cognitive reactivity. Empirical support for the predictions of this model derives from a combination of cross-sectional and prospective studies. In this article, we evaluate this evidence with the goal of determining whether mood-induced cognitive reactivity can be considered a risk factor for depressive relapse/recurrence. Our review demonstrates sufficient evidence to consider cognitive reactivity as a potential causal risk factor for depressive relapse/recurrence. Furthermore, we extend the application of this model to the problem of suicidal relapse/recurrence including a review of preliminary support for this approach.
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              Panic disorder in association with relaxation induced anxiety: An attentional training approach to treatment

               Adrian Wells (1991)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Psychology
                J. Clin. Psychol.
                Wiley
                0021-9762
                1097-4679
                March 2006
                March 2006
                2006
                : 62
                : 3
                : 373-386
                Article
                10.1002/jclp.20237
                16385481
                © 2006
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jclp.20237

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