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      Reliability and validity of Arabic Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (AREALD-30) in Saudi Arabia

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          Abstract

          Background

          To evaluate the reliability and validity of Arabic Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (AREALD-30) in Saudi Arabia.

          Methods

          A convenience sample of 200 subjects was approached, of which 177 agreed to participate giving a response rate of 88.5%. Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (REALD-99), was translated into Arabic to prepare the longer and shorter versions of Arabic Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (AREALD-99 and AREALD-30). Each participant was provided with AREALD-99 which also includes words from AREALD-30. A questionnaire containing socio-behavioral information and Arabic Oral Health Impact Profile (A-OHIP-14) was also administered. Reliability of the AREALD-30 was assessed by re-administering it to 20 subjects after two weeks. Convergent and predictive validity of AREALD-30 was evaluated by its correlations with AREALD-99 and self-perceived oral health status, dental visiting habits and A-OHIP-14 respectively. Discriminant validity was assessed in relation to the educational level while construct validity was evaluated by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

          Results

          Reliability of AREALD-30 was excellent with intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99. It exhibited good convergent and discriminant validity but poor predictive validity. CFA showed presence of two factors and infit mean-square statistics for AREALD-30 were all within the desired range of 0.50 - 2.0 in Rasch analysis.

          Conclusions

          AREALD-30 showed excellent reliability, good convergent and concurrent validity, but failed to predict the differences between the subjects categorized based on their oral health outcomes.

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          Most cited references32

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          Psychometric Theory.

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            Derivation and validation of a short-form oral health impact profile.

            Growing recognition that quality of life is an important outcome of dental care has created a need for a range of instruments to measure oral health-related quality of life. This study aimed to derive a subset of items from the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49)-a 49-item questionnaire that measures people's perceptions of the impact of oral conditions on their well-being. Secondary analysis was conducted using data from an epidemiologic study of 1217 people aged 60+ years in South Australia. Internal reliability analysis, factor analysis and regression analysis were undertaken to derive a subset (OHIP-14) questionnaire and its validity was evaluated by assessing associations with sociodemographic and clinical oral status variables. Internal reliability of the OHIP-14 was evaluated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Regression analysis yielded an optimal set of 14 questions. The OHIP-14 accounted for 94% of variance in the OHIP-49; had high reliability (alpha = 0.88); contained questions from each of the seven conceptual dimensions of the OHIP-49; and had a good distribution of prevalence for individual questions. OHIP-14 scores and OHIP-49 scores displayed the same pattern of variation among sociodemographic groups of older adults. In a multivariate analysis of dentate people, eight oral status and sociodemographic variables were associated (P < 0.05) with both the OHIP-49 and the OHIP-14. While it will be important to replicate these findings in other populations, the findings suggest that the OHIP-14 has good reliability, validity and precision.
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              The intraclass correlation coefficient as a measure of reliability.

              J J Bartko (1966)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                santosh_dentist@yahoo.com
                faeq_ali@yahoo.com
                apakpour@qums.ac.ir
                asnancom@hotmail.com
                drsayed203@gmail.com
                dr.mashyakhy@hotmail.com
                aadilinamdar@gmail.com
                docjyotia@yahoo.co.in
                Journal
                BMC Oral Health
                BMC Oral Health
                BMC Oral Health
                BioMed Central (London )
                1472-6831
                29 September 2014
                29 September 2014
                2014
                : 14
                : 1
                : 120
                Affiliations
                [ ]Population & Social Health Research Group, Griffith Health Institute, School of Dentistry and Oral health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
                [ ]Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Jazan University, P.O Box: 114, Jazan, 45142 Saudi Arabia
                [ ]Department of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
                [ ]Head, Saudi Dental Society, Ministry of Health, Jazan, Saudi Arabia
                [ ]School of health related professions, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA
                [ ]Department of Endodontics, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia
                Article
                450
                10.1186/1472-6831-14-120
                4190341
                25267119
                cfff1e60-eeb6-43c6-97cc-eebd99a9d2b7
                © Tadakamadla et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

                This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                History
                : 21 February 2014
                : 26 September 2014
                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2014

                Dentistry
                reald-30,arabic,health literacy,dental,word recognition instrument
                Dentistry
                reald-30, arabic, health literacy, dental, word recognition instrument

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