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The effect of selenium, as selenite, on vanadate-induced ROS generation in CHO-K1 cells measured using dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay

Trace Elements and Electrolytes

Dustri-Verlgag Dr. Karl Feistle

vanadium, selenium, interaction, ROS, DCFH-DA

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      Abstract

      Abstract. Objective: Vanadium is an established worldwide environmental pollutant whose toxic effects on living systems represent a growing safety concern. The generation of reactive oxidative species (ROS) is indicated as the main cause of vanadium adverse health effects. However, the knowledge about the potential interactions between vanadium and essential micronutrients with antioxidant activity such as selenium on oxidative stress markers is very restricted. Materials and methods: Herein, we used CHO-K1 cells to find out if vanadium can interact with selenium on the generation of ROS measured with a fluorescein probe, dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) dye. For the detection of interactive effects, we have analyzed the data with a statistical tool two-way ANOVA. Results: As expected, a marked rise in ROS generation in the cells following 2-. or 24-hour treatment with 100 µM NaVO 3 alone was observed. The two-way ANOVA did not detect significant interaction between 100 µM vanadate and selenite (0.5 µM and 1 µM) on ROS production following 2 and 24 hours co-exposure although a mild tendency (p = 0.117) towards synergistic interactive effects between 100 µM vanadate, and 1 µM selenite emerged after 24 hours of co-exposure. Conclusion: These findings show that selenium, as selenite, may not be beneficial in the treatment of vanadium toxicity.


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      Most cited references 31

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      Selenium and human health.

      Selenium is incorporated into selenoproteins that have a wide range of pleiotropic effects, ranging from antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects to the production of active thyroid hormone. In the past 10 years, the discovery of disease-associated polymorphisms in selenoprotein genes has drawn attention to the relevance of selenoproteins to health. Low selenium status has been associated with increased risk of mortality, poor immune function, and cognitive decline. Higher selenium status or selenium supplementation has antiviral effects, is essential for successful male and female reproduction, and reduces the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Prospective studies have generally shown some benefit of higher selenium status on the risk of prostate, lung, colorectal, and bladder cancers, but findings from trials have been mixed, which probably emphasises the fact that supplementation will confer benefit only if intake of a nutrient is inadequate. Supplementation of people who already have adequate intake with additional selenium might increase their risk of type-2 diabetes. The crucial factor that needs to be emphasised with regard to the health effects of selenium is the inextricable U-shaped link with status; whereas additional selenium intake may benefit people with low status, those with adequate-to-high status might be affected adversely and should not take selenium supplements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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        Hospital admissions and chemical composition of fine particle air pollution.

        There are unexplained geographical and seasonal differences in the short-term effects of fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) on human health. The hypothesis has been advanced to include the possibility that such differences might be due to variations in the PM(2.5) chemical composition, but evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To examine whether variation in the relative risks (RR) of hospitalization associated with ambient exposure to PM(2.5) total mass reflects differences in PM(2.5) chemical composition. We linked two national datasets by county and by season: (1) long-term average concentrations of PM(2.5) chemical components for 2000-2005 and (2) RRs of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations for persons 65 years or older associated with a 10-microg/m(3) increase in PM(2.5) total mass on the same day for 106 U.S. counties for 1999 through 2005. We found a positive and statistically significant association between county-specific estimates of the short-term effects of PM(2.5) on cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and county-specific levels of vanadium, elemental carbon, or nickel PM(2.5) content. Communities with higher PM(2.5) content of nickel, vanadium, and elemental carbon and/or their related sources were found to have higher risk of hospitalizations associated with short-term exposure to PM(2.5).
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          Protection against reactive oxygen species by selenoproteins.

          Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are derived from cellular oxygen metabolism and from exogenous sources. An excess of ROS results in oxidative stress and may eventually cause cell death. ROS levels within cells and in extracellular body fluids are controlled by concerted action of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The essential trace element selenium exerts its antioxidant function mainly in the form of selenocysteine residues as an integral constituent of ROS-detoxifying selenoenzymes such as glutathione peroxidases (GPx), thioredoxin reductases (TrxR) and possibly selenoprotein P (SeP). In particular, the dual role of selenoprotein P as selenium transporter and antioxidant enzyme is highlighted herein. A cytoprotective effect of selenium supplementation has been demonstrated for various cell types including neurons and astrocytes as well as endothelial cells. Maintenance of full GPx and TrxR activity by adequate dietary selenium supply has been proposed to be useful for the prevention of several cardiovascular and neurological disorders. On the other hand, selenium supplementation at supranutritional levels has been utilised for cancer prevention: antioxidant selenoenzymes as well as prooxidant effects of selenocompounds on tumor cells are thought to be involved in the anti-carcinogenic action of selenium.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Trace Elements and Electrolytes
            TE
            Dustri-Verlgag Dr. Karl Feistle
            0946-2104
            January 16 2018
            10.5414/TEX01515
            © 2018
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