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      Student-Reported Attitudes during an Interprofessional Palliative Care Learning Experience: Implications for Dual-Professional Identity, Interdisciplinary Bias, and Patient Outcomes

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          Abstract

          Background: The geriatric population in the United States is in need of palliative care (PC), yet it is not consistently established in the curriculum across health care training programs. There is a clarion call to reform the education of health care students using interprofessional education (IPE). The Joint Commission reported that communication errors represent two-thirds of the causes behind provider sentinel events in health care.

          Objective: The purpose of this study was to design, implement, and assess an IPE curriculum on PC to understand interprofessional student attitudes.

          Design/Setting: Three professors conducted a mixed-methods study at a California university involving an IPE PC event for 40 nursing and speech-language pathology students, and administered the Interprofessional Attitudes Survey (IPAS) and reflective questions.

          Results: Qualitative findings indicated that students increased their knowledge about PC and the purpose/value of IPE. Four out of the five IPAS subscales had positive outcomes: teamwork and roles/responsibilities, patient-centeredness, diversity/ethics, and community-centeredness. Interprofessional-biases subscale revealed that 33% of the participants reported biases toward students from other health care disciplines, and 35% reported that students from other health care disciplines held similar biases toward them. However, only 25% did not believe that the interdisciplinary biases interfered with patient outcomes.

          Conclusion: The study identified the existence of interprofessional biases and prejudices that may impede collaboration among health care professionals resulting in reduced health care outcomes. Faculty and health educators are encouraged to embed IPE into a multidisciplinary curriculum that dismantles preexisting interdisciplinary biases and stereotypes, and constructs dual-professional identity. IRB ID #904203-1

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          Most cited references 10

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          Core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice: 2016 update.

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            Evaluation of evidence for interprofessional education.

            Based on recommendations from numerous organizations, educators in healthcare disciplines are implementing interprofessional training programs. Our objective was to summarize relevant literature in a way that would be most useful to clinician educators. Studies involving educational interventions in health professions to enhance learner-based outcomes relevant to the provision of interprofessional care were identified. We sought prospective, controlled trials in which at least 2 health care disciplines were represented, and 1 of which was medicine. Thirteen reports met the criteria for inclusion. Interventions varied widely in design and intensity, but generally included both didactic and clinical components and lasted several weeks or longer. Most studies used pretest/posttest controls and observed positive effects on learners' attitudes and knowledge. Combined clinical and didactic experiences may produce short-term improvements in learners' knowledge and attitudes about interprofessional care. Future research should employ control groups and validated, behaviorally oriented outcome measures whenever possible.
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              The Development and Validation of the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale: Assessing the Interprofessional Attitudes of Students in the Health Professions

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Palliat Med Rep
                Palliat Med Rep
                pmr
                Palliative Medicine Reports
                Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (140 Huguenot Street, 3rd FloorNew Rochelle, NY 10801USA )
                2689-2820
                11 December 2020
                2020
                11 December 2020
                : 1
                : 1
                : 307-313
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ]School of Nursing, California State University Sacramento, Sacramento, California, USA.
                [ 2 ]Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, California State University Sacramento, Sacramento, California, USA.
                [ 3 ]Hospital Medicine and Palliative Care, University of California, Department of Internal Medicine, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, USA.
                Author notes
                [* ]Address correspondence to: Nassrine Noureddine, EdD, MSN, RN, School of Nursing, California State University Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819, USA, noureddinen@ 123456csus.edu
                Article
                10.1089/pmr.2020.0096
                10.1089/pmr.2020.0096
                8241387
                34223490
                © Nassrine Noureddine et al., 2020; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

                This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 2, References: 26, Pages: 7
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