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      Wet corrosion behavior of copper exposed to recycled groundnut oil as biofuel

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          Abstract

          The scarcity of fossil fuels may lead to a depletion of coal, oil and natural gas in the near future. Alternative fuels, especially biofuels, are receiving considerable attention for their environmental benefits. Biodiesel is a renewable and clean burning fuel that is made from waste vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel vehicles. Biodiesel produces fewer toxic pollutants and greenhouse gases than petroleum diesel. Many biofuels have been extracted and synthesized but little has been undertaken to study their effects on corrosion. The present investigation aims to evaluate the wet corrosion behavior of copper in used groundnut oil (UGNO) as a biofuel. The varieties of its blending ratios with commercial diesel (5, 10 and 20 %) were studied in accord with the mass loss method for a period of 100 h. The corrosion rate of the metal was evaluated according to mass loss and electrochemical methods. The corrosivity and conductivity of the test media were positively correlated. Wettability studies also supported the non-corrosive nature of biodiesel.

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          Most cited references20

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          Recent Strategy of Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil and Process Influencing Parameters: A Review

          Cost of biodiesel produced from virgin vegetable oil through transesterification is higher than that of fossil fuel, because of high raw material cost. To minimize the biofuel cost, in recent days waste cooking oil was used as feedstock. Catalysts used in this process are usually acids, base, and lipase. Since lipase catalysts are much expensive, the usage of lipase in biodiesel production is limited. In most cases, NaOH is used as alkaline catalyst, because of its low cost and higher reaction rate. In the case of waste cooking oil containing high percentage of free fatty acid, alkaline catalyst reacts with free fatty acid and forms soap by saponification reaction. Also, it reduces the biodiesel conversions. In order to reduce the level of fatty acid content, waste cooking oil is pretreated with acid catalyst to undergo esterification reaction, which also requires high operating conditions. In this review paper, various parameters influencing the process of biofuel production such as reaction rate, catalyst concentration, temperature, stirrer speed, catalyst type, alcohol used, alcohol to oil ratio, free fatty acid content, and water content have been summarized.
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            Production of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil via KM Micromixer

            The production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils through its pretreatment followed by transesterification process in presence of methanol was investigated using a KM micromixer reactor. The parameters affecting biodiesel production process such as alcohol to oil molar ratio, catalyst concentration, the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a cosolvent, and the volumetric flow rates of inlet fluids were optimized. The properties of the produced biodiesel were compared with its parent waste oil through different characterization techniques. The presence of methyl ester groups at the produced biodiesel was confirmed using both the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the thermal analysis of the produced biodiesel and the comparable waste oil indicated that the product after the transesterification process began to vaporize at 120°C which makes it lighter than its parent oil which started to vaporize at around 300°C. The maximum biodiesel production yield of 97% was recorded using 12 : 1 methanol to oil molar ratio in presence of both 1% NaOH and THF/methanol volume ratio 0.3 at 60 mL/h flow rate.
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              Optimized Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil by Lipase Immobilized on Magnetic Nanoparticles

              Biodiesel, a non-toxic and biodegradable fuel, has recently become a major source of renewable alternative fuels. Utilization of lipase as a biocatalyst to produce biodiesel has advantages over common alkaline catalysts such as mild reaction conditions, easy product separation, and use of waste cooking oil as raw material. In this study, Pseudomonas cepacia lipase immobilized onto magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) was used for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. The optimal dosage of lipase-bound MNP was 40% (w/w of oil) and there was little difference between stepwise addition of methanol at 12 h- and 24 h-intervals. Reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio (methanol/oil), and water content (w/w of oil) were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimal reaction conditions were 44.2 °C, substrate molar ratio of 5.2, and water content of 12.5%. The predicted and experimental molar conversions of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were 80% and 79%, respectively.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                mp
                Materials Testing
                Carl Hanser Verlag
                0025-5300
                2195-8572
                4 February 2019
                : 61
                : 2
                : 131-135
                Affiliations
                1 Chennai
                2 Coimbatore
                3 Erode, Tamil Nadu
                4 Kharagpur, West Bengal, India
                Author notes
                [* ] Correspondence Address, Prof. Dr. Rathanasamy Rajasekar, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kongu Engineering College, Perundurai, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India, E-mail: rajasekar.cr@ 123456gmail.com

                Govindharajan Sangeetha, born 1989, obtained her MSc degree in 2009 at S. T. E.T College and her MPhil in 2012 at Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. She gained research experience during 2011 and 2012 at the Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. Since 2016, she has been working in Scope International, Chennai, India.

                Prof. Dr. Raman Saratha, born 1962, is presently working as Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. Her areas of specialization are Corrosion Science, Environmental Chemistry and Biofuels.

                Assistant Prof. Viswapriya Shanmugam, born 1984, has been working in the Department of Chemistry, Kongu Engineering College, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India, since 2008. She received her MSc and MPhil degrees from the Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. Her research and publication interests include Corrosion Science, Environmental Chemistry and Biofuels.

                Dr. Rathanasamy Rajasekar, born 1982, obtained his MSc and PhD degrees in 2008 and 2011, respectively, at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in the stream of Materials Science. He gained Post-Doctoral Research experience 2011 and 2012 in the Department of Polymer & Nano Engineering at Chonbuk National University, South Korea. Since 2012, he has been working as a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Kongu Engineering College, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India.

                Velu Kaliyannan Gobinath, born 1989, obtained his BEng degree in 2012 at Maharaja Engineering College. He received his Master of Engineering at Kongu Engineering College, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India in 2014, focusing on CAD/CAM. He is currently working as a Junior Research Fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Kongu Engineering College, Erode, India.

                Palaniappan Sathish Kumar, born in 1991, finished his Bachelor's degree in Engineering (mechanical stream) at the University College of Engineering Villupuram (A Constituent College of Anna University, Chennai), Tamil Nadu, India in 2012. He received his Master of Engineering from Kongu Engineering College, Erode, Tamil Nadu, India which he completed with distinction in 2014 in focusing on CAD/CAM. Currently, he is pursuing a Ph.D. in the Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, West Bengal, India.

                Article
                MP111294
                10.3139/120.111294
                d04b5d1d-15b2-49c7-8cf7-2171748e464f
                © 2019, Carl Hanser Verlag, München
                History
                Page count
                References: 20, Pages: 5
                Categories
                Fachbeiträge/Technical Contributions

                Materials technology,Materials characterization,Materials science
                Materials technology, Materials characterization, Materials science

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