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      Removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by the boron-nitrogen co-doped carbon nanotubes: Insights into peroxymonosulfate adsorption and activation

      , , ,
      Separation and Purification Technology
      Elsevier BV

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          Nitrogen-doped graphene as efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in fuel cells.

          Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of methane in the presence of ammonia. The resultant N-graphene was demonstrated to act as a metal-free electrode with a much better electrocatalytic activity, long-term operation stability, and tolerance to crossover effect than platinum for oxygen reduction via a four-electron pathway in alkaline fuel cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of graphene and its derivatives as metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction. The important role of N-doping to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be applied to various carbon materials for the development of other metal-free efficient ORR catalysts for fuel cell applications, even new catalytic materials for applications beyond fuel cells.
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            Combined Effect of Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups of Microporous Activated Carbon on its Electrochemical Performance in Supercapacitors

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              Persulfate activation on crystallographic manganese oxides: Mechanism of singlet oxygen evolution for nonradical selective degradation of aqueous contaminants

              Minerals and transitional metal oxides of earth-abundant elements are desirable catalysts for in situ chemical oxidation in environmental remediation. However, catalytic activation of peroxydisulfate (PDS) by manganese oxides was barely investigated. In this study, one-dimension manganese dioxides (α- and β-MnO2) were discovered as effective PDS activators among the diverse manganese oxides for selective degradation of organic contaminants. Compared with other chemical states and crystallographic structures of manganese oxide, β-MnO2 nanorods exhibited the highest phenol degradation rate (0.044 min-1, 180 min) by activating PDS. A comprehensive study was conducted utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance, chemical probes, radical scavengers, and different solvents to identity the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Singlet oxygen (1O2) was unveiled to be the primary ROS, which was generated by direct oxidation or recombination of superoxide ions and radicals from a metastable manganese intermediate at neutral pH. The study dedicates to the first mechanistic study into PDS activation over manganese oxides and provides a novel catalytic system for selective removal of organic contaminants in wastewater.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Separation and Purification Technology
                Separation and Purification Technology
                Elsevier BV
                13835866
                March 2021
                March 2021
                : 259
                : 118196
                Article
                10.1016/j.seppur.2020.118196
                d0593b16-b75c-43c0-a99f-71cdee3e3b13
                © 2021

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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