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      Acceptance of Healthcare Robots for the Older Population: Review and Future Directions

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      International Journal of Social Robotics
      Springer Nature

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          Measurement Instruments for the Anthropomorphism, Animacy, Likeability, Perceived Intelligence, and Perceived Safety of Robots

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            In the hands of machines? The future of aged care

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              Animal-assisted therapy and loneliness in nursing homes: use of robotic versus living dogs.

              Loneliness is a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCF) and previous work has shown that animal-assisted therapy (AAT) can to some degree reverse loneliness. Here, we compared the ability of a living dog (Dog) and a robotic dog (AIBO) to treat loneliness in elderly patients living in LTCF. In comparison with a control group not receiving AAT, both the Dog and AIBO groups had statistically significant improvements in their levels of loneliness. As measured by a modified Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale (MLAPS), residents showed high levels of attachment to both the dog and AIBO. Subscale analysis showed that the AIBO group scored lower than the living dog on "animal rights/animal welfare" but not on "general attachment" or "people substituting." However, MLAPS measures did not correlate with changes in loneliness, showing that attachment was not the mechanism by which AAT decreases loneliness. We conclude that interactive robotic dogs can reduce loneliness in residents of LTCF and that residents become attached to these robots. However, level of attachment does not explain the decrease in loneliness associated with AAT conducted with either a living or robotic dog.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Social Robotics
                Int J of Soc Robotics
                Springer Nature
                1875-4791
                1875-4805
                November 2009
                October 2009
                : 1
                : 4
                : 319-330
                Article
                10.1007/s12369-009-0030-6
                d0f400a7-e58c-4619-af35-7763a40f061c
                © 2009
                History

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