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      The H19 lincRNA is a developmental reservoir of miR-675 which suppresses growth and Igf1r

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          Abstract

          The H19 large intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) is one of the most highly abundant and conserved transcripts in mammalian development, being expressed in both embryonic and extraembryonic cell lineages, yet its physiological function is unknown. Here we show that miR-675, a microRNA (miRNA) embedded within H19’s first exon, is expressed exclusively in the placenta from the gestational time point when placental growth normally ceases, and placentas that lack H19 continue to grow. Overexpression of miR-675 in a range of embryonic and extraembryonic cell lines results in their reduced proliferation; targets of the miRNA are upregulated in the H19 null placenta, including the growth promoting Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor ( Igf1r). Moreover, the excision of miR-675 from H19 is dynamically regulated by the stress response RNA binding protein HuR. These results suggest that H19’s main physiological role is in limiting growth of the placenta prior to birth, by regulated processing of miR-675. The controlled release of miR-675 from H19 may also allow rapid inhibition of cell proliferation in response to cellular stress or oncogenic signals.

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          Most cited references 33

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          Gene silencing by microRNAs: contributions of translational repression and mRNA decay.

          Despite their widespread roles as regulators of gene expression, important questions remain about target regulation by microRNAs. Animal microRNAs were originally thought to repress target translation, with little or no influence on mRNA abundance, whereas the reverse was thought to be true in plants. Now, however, it is clear that microRNAs can induce mRNA degradation in animals and, conversely, translational repression in plants. Recent studies have made important advances in elucidating the relative contributions of these two different modes of target regulation by microRNAs. They have also shed light on the specific mechanisms of target silencing, which, although it differs fundamentally between plants and animals, shares some common features between the two kingdoms.
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            The microRNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans.

            MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of tiny RNAs thought to regulate the expression of protein-coding genes in plants and animals. In the present study, we describe a computational procedure to identify miRNA genes conserved in more than one genome. Applying this program, known as MiRscan, together with molecular identification and validation methods, we have identified most of the miRNA genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The total number of validated miRNA genes stands at 88, with no more than 35 genes remaining to be detected or validated. These 88 miRNA genes represent 48 gene families; 46 of these families (comprising 86 of the 88 genes) are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae, and 22 families are conserved in humans. More than a third of the worm miRNAs, including newly identified members of the lin-4 and let-7 gene families, are differentially expressed during larval development, suggesting a role for these miRNAs in mediating larval developmental transitions. Most are present at very high steady-state levels-more than 1000 molecules per cell, with some exceeding 50,000 molecules per cell. Our census of the worm miRNAs and their expression patterns helps define this class of noncoding RNAs, lays the groundwork for functional studies, and provides the tools for more comprehensive analyses of miRNA genes in other species.
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              Mice carrying null mutations of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (Igf-1) and type 1 IGF receptor (Igf1r).

              Newborn mice homozygous for a targeted disruption of insulin-like growth factor gene (Igf-1) exhibit a growth deficiency similar in severity to that previously observed in viable Igf-2 null mutants (60% of normal birthweight). Depending on genetic background, some of the Igf-1(-/-) dwarfs die shortly after birth, while others survive and reach adulthood. In contrast, null mutants for the Igf1r gene die invariably at birth of respiratory failure and exhibit a more severe growth deficiency (45% normal size). In addition to generalized organ hypoplasia in Igf1r(-/-) embryos, including the muscles, and developmental delays in ossification, deviations from normalcy were observed in the central nervous system and epidermis. Igf-1(-/-)/Igf1r(-/-) double mutants did not differ in phenotype from Igf1r(-/-) single mutants, while in Igf-2(-)/Igf1r(-/-) and Igf-1(-/-)/Igf-2(-) double mutants, which are phenotypically identical, the dwarfism was further exacerbated (30% normal size). The roles of the IGFs in mouse embryonic development, as revealed from the phenotypic differences between these mutants, are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                100890575
                21417
                Nat Cell Biol
                Nat. Cell Biol.
                Nature cell biology
                1465-7392
                1476-4679
                14 May 2012
                10 June 2012
                01 January 2013
                : 14
                : 7
                : 659-665
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Epigenetics Programme, Babraham Institute, Cambridge, CB22 3AT, UK
                [2 ]Proteomics Group, Babraham Institute, Cambridge, CB22 3AT, UK
                [3 ]Genetics and Development Department, Inserm U1016, CNRS UMR 8104, University of Paris Descartes, Institut Cochin, Paris, France
                [4 ]Lillehei Heart Institute and Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, 312 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
                [5 ]HUDERF-ULB Genetics Center, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
                [6 ]Centre for Trophoblast Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EG, UK
                Article
                UKMS48289
                10.1038/ncb2521
                3389517
                22684254

                Users may view, print, copy, download and text and data- mine the content in such documents, for the purposes of academic research, subject always to the full Conditions of use: http://www.nature.com/authors/editorial_policies/license.html#terms

                Funding
                Funded by: Medical Research Council :
                Award ID: G0801156(87767) || MRC_
                Categories
                Article

                Cell biology

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