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      Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis : A Meta-Analysis

      , MN, , MN, , PHD, , MN, , MD, , MD

      Medicine

      Wolters Kluwer Health

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          Abstract

          Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS.

          A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0).

          A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, −0.99; 95% CI, −1.61 to −0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, −0.58; 95% CI, −1.10 to −0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, −0.31; 95% CI, −0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, −0.18 to 1.78) was not increased.

          Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for this given population due to some limitations impaired the power of our study.

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          Most cited references 34

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          2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

          This first update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and reworded if necessary. Decisions on new recommendations were made — if necessary after voting. The strength of the recommendations (SOR) was scored on an 11-point numerical rating scale after the meeting by email. These recommendations apply to patients of all ages that fulfill the modified NY criteria for AS, independent of extra-articular manifestations, and they take into account all drug and non-drug interventions related to AS. Four overarching principles were introduced, implying that one bullet has been moved to this section. There are now 11 bullet points including 2 new ones, one related to extra-articular manifestations and one to changes in the disease course. With a mean score of 9.1 (range 8-10) the SOR was generally very good.
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            Efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

            To evaluate the safety and efficacy of adalimumab, a fully human recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody that specifically targets human tumor necrosis factor, in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This was a multicenter, randomized (2:1 ratio), double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate a subcutaneous injection of adalimumab, 40 mg every other week, compared with placebo for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the percentage of patients with a 20% response according to the ASsessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Working Group criteria for improvement (ASAS20) at week 12. Secondary outcome measures included the ASAS20 at week 24 and multiple measures of disease activity, spinal mobility, and function, as well as ASAS partial remission. At week 12, 58.2% of adalimumab-treated patients (121 of 208) achieved an ASAS20 response, compared with 20.6% of placebo-treated patients (22 of 107) (P < 0.001). More patients in the adalimumab group (45.2% [94 of 208]) than in the placebo group (15.9% [17 of 107]) had at least a 50% improvement in the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index at week 12 (P < 0.001). Significant improvements in the ASAS40 response and the response according to the ASAS5/6 criteria at weeks 12 and 24 were also demonstrated (P < 0.001). Partial remission was achieved by more adalimumab-treated patients than placebo-treated patients (22.1% versus 5.6%; P < 0.001). Adalimumab-treated patients reported more adverse events (75.0% versus 59.8% of placebo-treated patients; P < 0.05), but there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Adalimumab was well-tolerated during the 24-week study period and was associated with a significant and sustained reduction in the signs and symptoms of active AS.
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              Efficacy and safety of infliximab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: results of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial (ASSERT).

              The signs and symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) respond inadequately to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in quite a number of patients. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors have demonstrated success in reducing AS disease activity in a limited number of clinical trials. The objective of this multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of infliximab in patients with AS. Patients were randomly assigned to receive infusions of placebo or 5 mg/kg infliximab at weeks 0, 2, 6, 12, and 18. Efficacy was assessed using the ASsessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) International Working Group criteria, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), night pain, patient's global assessment, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), chest expansion, the Mander enthesis index, the total swollen joint index, the C-reactive protein level, and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire. The primary end point in this study was the proportion of patients with a 20% improvement response according to the ASAS International Working Group criteria (ASAS20 responders) at week 24. Of the 357 patients screened, 201 were assigned to receive 5 mg/kg infliximab and 78 were assigned to receive placebo. After 24 weeks, 61.2% of patients in the infliximab group were ASAS20 responders compared with 19.2% of patients in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Clinical benefit was observed in patients receiving infliximab as early as week 2 and was maintained over the 24-week study period. Patients receiving infliximab also showed significant improvements in the BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI, chest expansion, and physical component summary score of the SF-36. Adverse events were reported by 82.2% of patients receiving infliximab and by 72.0% of patients receiving placebo; however, most adverse events in both treatment groups were mild or moderate in severity. Infliximab was well tolerated and effective in a large cohort of patients with AS during a 24-week study period.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                MEDI
                Medicine
                Wolters Kluwer Health
                0025-7974
                1536-5964
                December 2015
                18 December 2015
                : 94
                : 50
                Affiliations
                From the School of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China (HL, W-RL, HZ, C-MW); Graduate College, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People's Republic of China (XT); School of Nursing, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People's Republic of China (XT); and Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China (WW).
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Wei Wei Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154, Anshan Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300052, People's Republic of China (e-mail: tjweiwei2003@ 123456163.com ).
                Chun-Mei Wang, School of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University, No. 22, Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People's Republic of China (e-mail: cmwang8543@ 123456126.com ).
                Article
                02254
                10.1097/MD.0000000000002254
                5058915
                26683943
                Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

                This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0, where it is permissible to download, share and reproduce the work in any medium, provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0

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