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      Evidence for reduced export productivity following the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction : PRODUCTIVITY AFTER THE K/PG BOUNDARY

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          REVISED CARBONATE-WATER ISOTOPIC TEMPERATURE SCALE

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            Mass extinctions in the marine fossil record.

            A new compilation of fossil data on invertebrate and vertebrate families indicates that four mass extinctions in the marine realm are statistically distinct from background extinction levels. These four occurred late in the Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods. A fifth extinction event in the Devonian stands out from the background but is not statistically significant in these data. Background extinction rates appear to have declined since Cambrian time, which is consistent with the prediction that optimization of fitness should increase through evolutionary time.
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              The Chicxulub asteroid impact and mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary.

              The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary approximately 65.5 million years ago marks one of the three largest mass extinctions in the past 500 million years. The extinction event coincided with a large asteroid impact at Chicxulub, Mexico, and occurred within the time of Deccan flood basalt volcanism in India. Here, we synthesize records of the global stratigraphy across this boundary to assess the proposed causes of the mass extinction. Notably, a single ejecta-rich deposit compositionally linked to the Chicxulub impact is globally distributed at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. The temporal match between the ejecta layer and the onset of the extinctions and the agreement of ecological patterns in the fossil record with modeled environmental perturbations (for example, darkness and cooling) lead us to conclude that the Chicxulub impact triggered the mass extinction.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Paleoceanography
                Paleoceanography
                Wiley
                08838305
                June 2015
                June 2015
                June 18 2015
                : 30
                : 6
                : 718-738
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Rutgers University; Piscataway New Jersey USA
                [2 ]Boone Pickens School of Geology; Oklahoma State University; Stillwater Oklahoma USA
                Article
                10.1002/2014PA002724
                d16626a3-7e7b-48e7-a25b-142e625db579
                © 2015

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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