Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Organic Field‐Effect Transistors as Flexible, Tissue‐Equivalent Radiation Dosimeters in Medical Applications

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Radiation therapy is one of the most prevalent procedures for cancer treatment, but the risks of malignancies induced by peripheral beam in healthy tissues surrounding the target is high. Therefore, being able to accurately measure the exposure dose is a critical aspect of patient care. Here a radiation detector based on an organic field‐effect transistor (RAD‐OFET) is introduced, an in vivo dosimeter that can be placed directly on a patient's skin to validate in real time the dose being delivered and ensure that for nearby regions an acceptable level of low dose is being received. This device reduces the errors faced by current technologies in approximating the dose profile in a patient's body, is sensitive for doses relevant to radiation treatment procedures, and robust when incorporated into conformal large‐area electronics. A model is proposed to describe the operation of RAD‐OFETs, based on the interplay between charge photogeneration and trapping.

          Abstract

          A radiation detector based on an organic field‐effect transistor (RAD‐OFET) is introduced for passive radiation dosimetry. RAD‐OFETs are tissue‐equivalent devices that can be placed directly on a patient's skin to directly measure radiation dose delivery and are sensitive for doses relevant to many radiation treatment procedures.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Contributors
          jurchescu@wfu.edu
          Journal
          Adv Sci (Weinh)
          Adv Sci (Weinh)
          10.1002/(ISSN)2198-3844
          ADVS
          Advanced Science
          John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
          2198-3844
          30 July 2020
          September 2020
          : 7
          : 18 ( doiID: 10.1002/advs.v7.18 )
          Affiliations
          [ 1 ] Department of Physics and Center for Functional Materials Wake Forest University Winston‐Salem NC 27109 USA
          [ 2 ] Department of Radiation Oncology Wake Forest School of Medicine Wake Forest University Winston Salem NC 27157 USA
          [ 3 ] University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research Lexington KY 40511 USA
          Author notes
          Article
          ADVS1923
          10.1002/advs.202001522
          7509662
          © 2020 The Authors. Published by WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

          This is an open access article under the terms of the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Page count
          Figures: 6, Tables: 0, Pages: 9, Words: 6389
          Product
          Funding
          Funded by: National Science Foundation , open-funder-registry 10.13039/100000001;
          Award ID: DMR‐1627925
          Award ID: ECCS‐ 1810273
          Funded by: National Science Foundation , open-funder-registry 10.13039/100000001;
          Funded by: Cooperative Agreement
          Award ID: 1849213
          Categories
          Communication
          Communications
          Custom metadata
          2.0
          September 23, 2020
          Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_JATSPMC version:5.9.1 mode:remove_FC converted:23.09.2020

          Comments

          Comment on this article